Butcher

Samuel Butcher

Born in Hungary

 

 

Little is known about Samuel Butcher, but Harriet and Fred Rochlin mention him in their book, Pioneer Jews: A New Life in the Far West.  Samuel appears to have been one of the few Jewish miners in Leadville during the 1880s:

“A few Jews did make industrial mining their lifelong trade.  Sam Butcher, a strapping Hungarian Jew who came to Colorado in 1875, worked in Leadville and later in Cripple Creek hacking out a living and a reputation as an able hard-rock miner and blaster.  Aware that miners could be abusively anti-Semitic – he had seen a man beaten for no other reason than that he was Jewish – Butcher took pains to conceal his identity.  A Leadville tailor, however, gave away the Hungarian’s secret.  Challenged by a knot of rough miners to cite a single Jew in their line, the tailor could not resist naming his muscular coreligionist.  By then, however, Butcher was an accepted member of the hard-rock miners’ fraternity, and the revelation was received with nothing more than surprise and disbelief.”[1]

While there are no mentions of a miner Sam Butcher in the census or city records, there is a rag seller who appears in the 1888 city directory of the same name.[2]   Nothing else is known of Sam Butcher in Leadville.

Names associated with this surname:

  • Samuel Butcher

1 Rochlin, Fred and Harriet. Pioneer Jews: A New Life in the Far West. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1984. Pg. 38.

2 1888 Leadville City Directory

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