Biography

Hyman

Mannie (Manny) Hyman

Born: May 12, 1851
(Schwersenz, Prussia)

Died: May 24, 1924
(Manhattan, New York)

Married to: Fannie Goldberg

In Leadville: 1882 to 1886

 

Levi Hyman

Born: 1825 (Russia)

Died: April 14, 1896
(Leadville, Colorado)

Married to: Sarah R. Hyman

In Leadville: 1889 to 1896

 

Sarah R. Friedman and Barnett (maiden name unknown)

Born: 1862 (Vilnius, Russia)

Died: March 25, 1926 (Denver, Colorado)

Married to: Levi Hyman (until 1896), Michael Friedman (1897),
Henry Barnett (1897-1904)

In Leadville: 1889 to 1924

Bessie Hyman

Born:

Died:

Married to: B. Blochman

 

Nathan Hyman

Born: 1878

Died: Unknown

Married to: Unknown

In Leadville: 1894 to 1895
and 1902 to 1909

 

Henry H. Hyman

Born: 1885

Died: January 9, 1904
(Leadville, Colorado)

Married to: None

In Leadville: 1885 to 1904

David Elliot Hyman

Born: August 17, 1891
(Leadville, Colorado)

Died: Unknown

Married to: Unknown

In Leadville: 1891 to 1920s

 

Mary (Hyman) Katz

Born: 1888 (Missouri)

Died: Unknown

Married to: Nathan Katz (1906-1911) Walter Moberg (19??-1947)

In Leadville: 1889 to ?

 

Sophie or Sophia (Hyman) Harris

Born: 1894 (Leadville, Colorado)

Died: Unknown

Married to: Mr. Harris

In Leadville: 1894 to 1910

Names associated with this surname:

  • Mannie Hyman
  • Levi Hyman
  • Sarah R. (Hyman) Barnett
  • Bessie Hyman
  • Nathan Hyman
  • Henry H. Hyman
  • David Elliot Hyman
  • Mary (Hyman) Katz Moberg
  • Still born infant Hyman
  • Sophie (Hyman) Harris
  • Fannie Goldberg
  • Michael Friedman
  • Henry Barnett
  • B. Blochman
  • Nathan Katz
  • Mr. Harris

Mannie Hyman

Mannie was born in Schwersenz, Prussia, on May 12, 1851. Today the town is in central Poland and was renamed Swarzędz in the mid-20th century. Like David May and other Jewish Prussian and German contemporaries of the time, Mannie immigrated to America in the mid-1860s. On December 22, 1865, he probably disembarked at the immigration port of Castle Garden, New York. He sailed aboard the ship Borussia which he had boarded at Hamburg, German Empire. [1] Mannie’s early life in America is unknown. He first appears in the mountains of Colorado in 1879. He was listed as M. Hyman with businesses under “Club Rooms” and “Wines and Liquors”, at Kokomo, Summit County during 1879. [2] His only presence in Leadville was to collect his mail; an “M. Hyman” is listed as the recipient of a package delivered to the Leadville post office by the South Park Stage Company in April of 1879.  [3]

 

In March of 1880, Mannie owned the Grand View mine and, according to the Leadville Weekly Democrat, the mine was in in great demand by investors and speculators. “Mr. Hyman is constantly receiving letters and telegrams from parties wishing to purchase the property…”  [4]

In 1881, he managed mining interests at “Gold Hill”, east of Kokomo. [5] Mannie also stopped at the Clarendon during the summer of 1881 while on business in Leadville. [6] On the evening of October 13, 1881 a fire began in the Summit House of Kokomo as a result of a faulty lamp. The town was new and not outfitted with firefighting capabilities. $400,000 in damage was done and nearly the entire camp was destroyed. M. Hyman’s saloon reported $3,500 in losses, which was probably his entire business. [7] Mannie likely focused on his mining interests for the remainder of his time in Kokomo though late 1882. The camp was rebuilt but ultimately Mannie did not stay for long.

 

Mannie purchased the Leadville saloon license of John Baer and A. Ridle in the early autumn of 1882. [8] John Baer operated a saloon at 314 Harrison Avenue according to the 1882 city directory. [9] This was next door to what would become Hyman’s Place at 316 Harrison Avenue. Both 314 and 316 Harrison Avenue storefronts appear as operations of Mannie’s throughout the next few years. Mannie moved to Leadville from Kokomo by the end of 1882; in December, he requested from Leadville City Council that “…certain special policeman be appointed to keep order in his house…” [10] This “house” was the Club Rooms that appear in the 1883 city directory.

He first made an appearance in the Leadville city directory as the proprietor of Hyman’s Club Rooms at 316 Harrison Avenue in 1883. The saloon had electric light installed in January 1883; one of earliest electrified businesses in the city. [11] He employed two porters during that year and lived at 224 Harrison Avenue; likely a residence above a commercial space. [12] Mannie was active in social events and attended the 6th Annual Leadville Purim Ball in March. [13] On March 22, Mannie attended a banquet at the Clarendon Hotel for the benefit of the employees of the Palace of Fashion. A few days earlier fellow Jewish merchants Butler and Frankle had been acquitted of arson. They were suspected as the igniters of a large downtown fire on East Chestnut the year before. M. Hyman, along with other Jewish notables such as J. H. Monheimer and David May helped to arrange the event. [14] Mannie was also involved in early baseball activities in Leadville. On March 17, 1883, he was elected as a director of the Leadville Baseball Club. [15] The Club filed articles of incorporation with the County Clerk in April and the object of the club was stated as, “the establishment fostering and encouragement of athletic sports in general and the playing of baseball in particular.” Mannie was one of thirteen directors the first year. [16]

That same month, Mannie put up a Leadville Blues uniform display in his saloon window and offered a box of cigars to each team member if they beat the Denver Browns in an upcoming game. [17] The Blues would go on to a moderately successful regional baseball season that summer. Their season included a victory against the Colorado Springs Reds on July 4th, a game which Mannie likely attended. [18] On June 30, Mannie participated in a boat rowing race on Evergreen Lake against a man named F. Baxter.

 

Mannie’s business life flourished during these years as well. Like many saloons then and now, patrons were often arrested and caused mayhem. In January a man named George Oliver was arrested at Hyman’s for “creating a disturbance” [19] and in March the Leadville Daily Herald reported, “A man was arrested in Hyman’s yesterday and as he would not go along peaceably Officer Roberts had quite a matinee trying to make him go at all.” [20]  More serious events also took place at Hyman’s during its first year of operation. At around 5:30 on an October morning, a man named O’Connor badly beat a Leadville police officer named Steadman with a rock behind Hyman’s after the officer tried to break up a fight in the alley. [21]

314 and 316 Harrison Avenue in 1883. Mannie oversaw the cigar store, gambling establishment (out back and separate from the saloon as law required) and the saloon club room shown here.

See Sanborn Fire Insurance Map in bibliography.

 

Courtesy Library of Congress.

Hyman’s Saloon and surroundings circa 1884.

 

Courtesy Denver Public Library Western History Collection, William Henry Jackson.

Closer view of sign in above photo.

Hyman’s was a center of social life and was the subject of several curious stories in later 1883 as well. On November 11, two men named Bill Bush and Jim Dexter ordered a bottle of German white wine. When the bottle arrived, the men bet Mannie $50 that the bottle was a not a genuine import. Mannie took the bet and offered to double it which was taken. Three Denver liquor importers were recruited to taste the wine and determine the authenticity, which they confirmed. Mannie won $100 dollars from Bush and Dexter. [22] In late 1883, Mannie invested in a strange enterprise. A man approached him at the saloon with the proposition that a “petrified” man could be located 50 miles south of Leadville. Presumably, the stone man could be displayed as a strange attraction at the saloon. Mannie joined the man who proposed the venture to recover the curiosity and instead of a stone man, a frozen dead man was found. The deal fell apart and Mannie reportedly lost $1000. [23] In December of 1883, a reporter stopped in at Hyman’s Place to ask about his success over the past year. The reporter elaborated,

“In the reportorial route for news no house in Leadville is more frequently sought or more prolific of information than Hyman’s club rooms, on Harrison Avenue… Other establishments of a similar calibre may complain of dull times, growl about the decline and predict the fall of Leadville, buy Hyman’s house is always crowded, and Hyman’s countenance wears a perpetual smile of perfect happiness.” The reporter asked Mannie about his success and the initially reserved response became more elaborate, and the reporter quoted, “‘I never like to talk about myself or my business to a newspaper man… but if a discovery of a ‘secret’ as you call it, will relieve your anxiety, I shall be happy to unfold it to you. One prime reason of my success is found in the fact that my patrons are treated alike- without discrimination as to wealth, worldly position or the clothes they wear. As a caterer to the public, I depend upon the public for success, and do not extend any more favors to the mining prince than I give to his humble employee. In my opinion all men are alike so long as

they conduct themselves as gentlemen, and my employees have instructions to insult nobody until they are insulted. That is one of the reasons of my success, and, I believe the principle one.’” The reporter then asked what his minor reasons for success were, “‘Well, I sell the best goods in the market at prices which rob neither my patrons or myself. I do not claim to sell better goods than my competitors- I merely claim to keep as good a stock as anyone else, and sell it as cheaply as anyone else.’”. Mannie continued, “‘…I have done an extensive business during the past year, for which I am very thankful to the public of Leadville.’” He also went on to note his charitable actives as associated with the “Sporting Men’s Relief Fund”.  [24]

 

In 1884 Mannie had five employees, three porters and two barkeepers. As it was in 1883, the bar was located at 316 Harrison Avenue, but Mannie had moved his residence to 405 Harrison Avenue, which he would buy in February. [25] 1884 was host to a wide variety of events at Hyman’s Place. In one fight Jack Chamberlain had a “…little friendly set-to…” with J. A. Brown in Hyman’s. After Brown accidentally bumped Chamberlain in the bar line, they exchanged epithets and the reporter for the Carbonate Chronicle continues:

“The result was that Brown seized a chair and was about to resolve it into its original elements over Chamberlain’s head, but instead of the intended object getting it, an innocent and unsuspecting chandelier that was looking down on the fight, received the full benefit of the blow.”

 

According to a witness, the falling chandelier hooked by the chair knocked out Brown and the assailant became the assailed. Both men were fined $5 and court costs with no charges filed. In January there was a raffle for “That Crazy Quilt” at Hyman’s Place. Presumably the quilt was an unusual item to be auctioned at a bar. [26] Mannie acquired the Star Block at 405 Harrison Avenue in early February for $15,000. He purchased the three-story commercial/residential structure from Jewish merchants David May and Moses Shoenberg. [27]Mannie relocated his residence to apartments there shortly after the sale was complete. Keno was a popular gambling diversion in Leadville and one advertisement claims free keno and a free dinner at Hyman’s Place. [28] Drinking was not the only diversion of Hyman’s Place and gambling was popular. However, saloons of the time could not openly host drinking and gambling activities in the same room by law. Gambling rooms were likely located in the back of the saloon in a cordoned area.

Advertising Card

 

Hyman's Club Rooms,

The Finest in the City

316 Harrison Ave. Leadville, Colo.

Next Door to Tabor Opera House

Open Day and Night

 

Collection of the Temple Israel Foundation,

Leadville, Colorado.

The “Star Block” in 1881 at 405 Harrison Avenue.

 

From page one of the Leadville Daily Herald October 21, 1881.

 

Courtesy Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection.

In mid-August Mannie’s saloon was witness to a shooting incident as Doc Holliday. Holliday shot William Allen during the afternoon of August 19th. [29] Accounts differ, but according to one witness, the first shot lodged in the front doorframe and the second shot hit Allen in the arm. Allen was taken to a house to recover and Holliday was taken to jail. Holliday claimed he was about to be attacked for an outstanding $5 debt with Allen. Witnesses testified that Allen was not armed at the time and was simply intent on speaking with Holliday. [30] The court proceedings lasted for some months and were in the newspapers of Leadville until well into 1885. Mannie testified briefly to the effect that Holliday had chosen Hyman’s for his “loafing place” and said nothing more publicly on the matter. Holliday was eventually acquitted of attempted murder charges after a lengthy and publicized trial. [31] The incident was likely one of Holliday’s last recorded public episodes before his death in 1887.

Shortly after the Holliday shooting in August, Hyman’s hosted a presidential poll which placed the Blain-Logan Republican ticket 19 votes ahead of the Cleveland- Hendricks Democratic ticket. Presumably this was an accurate political measure of men who patronized Hyman’s Place, and perhaps Mannie himself. Many Jews of Leadville at the time were committed Republicans, including David May. Mannie attended a Simchath Torah ball in October with the “elite” of the city including a mix of Jewish and gentile attendees. [32] In October, Mannie donated a flag to the Blaine-Logan Veterans club clearly identifying his Republican allegiances in the 1884 election. [33] Also in October, Mannie was listed as one of those wounded in a train collision outside of Leadville. He received a “contusion on the knee”.  [34]

The 1885 Leadville directory did not list a residence for Mannie, but the saloon was still listed at 316 Harrison. One porter and one barkeep appeared as the employees. [35] A January, 1885, social column mentions that Mannie was away from Leadville while he explored other business opportunities but intended to return within two months. [36] In February, he leased a mining property on East 6th street with several partners. [37] Later in the year after he returned to Leadville, an insane “opium fiend” named Oakley tried to send a note from the county jail to Mannie for an order of 1,000 cigars, one gallon of whiskey, powdered sugar, oranges, apples and lemons immediately. These were obviously not delivered but the instance was published in the newspaper on January 4, 1884. [38] Later that week the same man was released from jail under the care of his brother. Upon his release, Oakley ran

immediately to Hyman’s Place. Mannie gave him a cigar at no cost and was reported to be undisturbed by the interaction with the insane man; he was likely experienced with eccentric and unstable individuals and was often generous. [39] In June, Mannie raised funds for a medallion honoring a man named George W. Cook; the Rio Grand Western Railroad Leadville Office Superintendent who orchestrated rescue efforts following the Homestake Avalanche in April. In addition to his other charitable activities Mannie was selected in August to “solicit aid” for the completion of Temple Israel. [40] Mannie was naturalized as an American citizen in Leadville on December 2, 1885. [41]

Starting in 1886, Mannie went into partnership with Theodore Schultze and the bar name was changed to “Hyman M. & Co.” located at 314 and 316 Harrison Avenue and Mannie lived at 405 Harrison Avenue during this year. [42] This was an important year for the saloonkeeper as he had reached his height in Leadville, socially and financially. In late May, he was quoted in the Carbonate Chronicle with some wise words. The article continues:

 

“Mannie Hyman was standing with arms akimbo against his counter last night as the thirsty were drenching their blistered palates, and looking up from his reflections, muttered, Wie gewonnen, so zerronnen. The reporter [illegable wondered?] on the orthography of this transcript, but it struck rather forcibly, for the reason that the sporting man was evidently trying to whisper in his own ear and to keep his thoughts from the by-stander. ‘And that means what?’ interrupted the reporter. ‘Won easy, lost easy’ replied the interpreter [Mannie]. ‘I was just thinking of how these men with the cards won their money and then scattered it. I have seen tens of thousands, during a year, won and squandered, and I’ve come to the conclusion that the money realized over the layout is of very little benefit to the winner. It’s the same old story, however, and every day we see the German maxim, ‘Wie gewonnen, so zerronnen verified,’ and the sporting man sought his desk and began writing his love.”

The “love” of Mannie’s the reporter referred was Fannie Goldman; the niece of Leadville merchant Richard Metz. In mid-July, Fannie visited her aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Metz, and attended a fishing trip with Mannie along with other prominent Leadville Jews such as David May, Jacob Schloss, Fred Butler, and others. [43] Fannie and Mannie announced their engagement to Leadville newspapers in September of that year. [44] In late May, an expansion and modification Hyman’s place at 314 and 316 Harrison Avenue was finished. “The most complete clubhouse in the state will be opened Saturday night at Hyman’s” was a short line published in the Leadville Daily/Evening Chronicle on June 7, 1886. [45] Mannie advertised heavily in 1886 and “Abricote” (likely apricot) cocktails, “Fresh Lager Beer” and “Bottle Beer at Hyman’s”, and “Open day and night” were often advertised throughout the year as well as “Free Lunch”, “Play Keno- $100 roll”, a “Turkey Raffle” around Thanksgiving, and finally in late December “You can get a turkey for almost nothing”. Reports of crime and disorder at Hyman’s Place were less frequent in newspapers in 1886. The only incident to be found was one with a fraudulent salesman named Hohmann in May. [46]

By 1887, Mannie left Leadville. He married Fannie Goldman on February 1, 1887 in Cook County, Illinois. [47] While he never returned to live full time in Leadville, his saloon at 314-316 Harrison Avenue was still known as “Hyman’s Place” or “Hyman’s old stand” for several years despite different ownership. [48] The business was known officially as Hyman’s Place in the city directories until 1889 and was advertised for extensively in newspapers until 1889. [49] One reference in a newspaper claims the business was known as “Palace Resort” in the summer of 1887. [50]  In early 1887, Mannie sold a half interest in the building at 314-316 Harrison totaling $10,000 to Lewis Cohen. According to the Leadville Herald Democrat as quoted by Griswold, “The revenues that have been derived from this property since it was purchased by Hyman a few years ago, have been something enormous, and to-day it is regarded as one of the most valuable of the avenue possessions.” [51] During the course of the year, Mannie published a few ads for his new business in Denver in Leadville papers; one of these reads: “M. Hyman 1210 Sixteenth Street, Denver, state agent for Palacios, Rodriquez & Co.’s celebrated Aurcliae clear Havana cigars, at wholesale. A full fine stock.” [52] The block had a number of other successful businesses in the 1880s including the clothing store of David May, the Monarch Saloon and the Tabor Opera House.

In the early summer of 1890 as a half owner of the building, Mannie decided to build a new larger two story building on the site of 314-316 Harrison. An article elaborates, “When Mr. Mannie Hyman was last in the city, he determined on this move, and probably work will begin about the middle of summer.” [53] This building stands today with a keystone marking “Hyman Block 1890” and serves as the headquarters of the Leadville Race Series.

 

Mannie lived in Denver until around 1911 when he divorced Fannie. [54] He moved to New York and was living in a boarding house in 1920. [55] He died in Manhattan on May 24, 1924. [56]

Levi Hyman

Sarah Hyman (Barnett and Friedman)

A second Hyman family arrived in Leadville in 1889 and Levi was the patriarch. He was born in 1825 and is first listed as a tailor in the 1889 Leadville City Directory. He lived with his wife Sarah and children Henry, Mary, Nathan, Sofie, David and Bessie at 115 East 3rd Street. In early 1890, Levi applied for his naturalization papers and was presumably made a citizen that same year. [57] In this notice he was listed as a “Native of Germany”. In 1892, Levi’s daughter (from a previous marriage?), Bessie, married Mr. B. Blochman at the Hyman residence at 115 East 3rd Street. [58] Levi died on April 14, 1896, and was buried in the Leadville Hebrew Cemetery. [59] No obituary has been found.

Sarah R. Hyman was born in 1863. She came to Leadville with her husband Levi in 1889. In September that year, “Mrs. Sarah R. Hyman” appeared in court after an altercation at 115 East 3rd Street. A tenant named Mr. B. Dorrington and Sarah had a “row” after Mr. Dorrington tried to move out. A fight ensued and Sarah was fined $10 and costs after the jury determined she was “in the wrong”. [60] She first appears in the directory in 1897 only after Levi died with a residence at 115 East 3rd Street. Sarah remarried shortly after the death of Levi. The wedding was controversial and the Herald Democrat elaborated:

 

 

 

“Orthodox Hebrew society circles are in quite a flutter of excitement over the marriage of Mrs. Sarah Hyman and Michael Friedman, sometimes known as Michael Miller. The ceremony was performed by the rabbi of the Congregation Bnesseth [Knesseth] Zunda Greenwald, in the presence of a number of friends. The bride is a widow of some 56 summers, while the groom is about 28 years old. Friedman has been a devoted admirer of Mrs. Hyman for some time and surfing his recent troubles in the justice court she proved to be a good friend by going on his bond and keeping him out of a prison cell. The widow did not apparently desire the Friedman should take her for herself alone, but deeded over to him a large share of her real estate, of which she owns a considerable amount. Although the marriage might be said to be May and December both parties to the connubial event appear to be well satisfied and happy.”

The unusual arrangement clearly attracted some interest from the community due to the large age gap in the married parties. The union with Mr. Friedman did not last and Sarah later married Henry Barnett or Barnette. In 1902 “Mrs. Hyman Barnett” had a dispute with her neighbor at 115 East 3rd Street. During the ensuing row Sarah fell or was pushed into a cellar and was injured. Sarah’s 7 year old daughter, Sophie, testified at the trial with great precision as to time and order of events. But when she was muddled by the cross examination, she simply said she had forgotten and left the stand. [61]

 

Sarah lived in at 115 East 3rd Street in Leadville until 1924. She moved “on account of failing health” to Denver where she lived for several years. In March of 1926, she was lighting Shabbat candles when she accidentally caught her dress on fire. David Hyman was present but and could not douse the flames fast enough and Sarah passed later that evening. She was buried in the Leadville Hebrew Cemetery next to her first husband Levi Hyman and her son Henry Hyman. Her four remaining children David, Nathan, Sophie and Mrs. Walter Moberg (Mary Hyman) [62] attended the funeral. [63]

David Elliot Hyman

Nathan Hyman

Not to be confused with the David Hyman of Aspen, David E. Hyman of Leadville was the son of Levi and Sarah Hyman. According to his World War One draft registration card he was born August 17, 1891 in Leadville. David is listed on the honor roll of Room 1 at the Carbonate school in 1899 and 1900. [64] He and two other men named H. Barnett (likely David’s step-father Henry Barnett) and H. Block were arrested in 1907 on the charges of receiving stolen brass from boys who had been collecting it illegally in the city. David would later be involved in metals trade in Leadville and Denver.  In 1917, David claimed an exemption from the draft stating, “I do not believe in war.” [65] Despite his objection, he was called to arms and appears in a 1919 Leadville newspaper as a draftee with a

temporary discharge. He was sent to Camp Cody, New Mexico, on May 27, 1918. It is unknown if he was deployed to Europe or why he was temporary discharged. His draft registration card lists a physical defect as “a ruptured”. This incomplete line cannot be interpreted by the author. [66] As of 1920, David lived with his mother Sarah at 115 East 3rd Street. Throughout 1923, “D.E. Hyman” advertised a second hand store as well as an “Iron & Metal Co.” at 326 Harrison Avenue with a residential address of 115 East 3rd Street. [67] In 1926, his mother’s obituary placed him at 1740 Humboldt Street in Denver. David’s World War Two draft registration card places him at California Street in Denver. [68] He left Leadville before 1926. His death and burial location are unknown.

Nathan came with entire Hyman family to Leadville in 1889. He appears as a 13 year old participant in a footrace in 1890. [69] He first appears in the Leadville city directory in 1894 at 115 E. 3rd Street. He was employed as a clerk at the Sands Brothers store. [70] In 1895, he was again located at 115 E. 3rd Street with no occupation or business place listed. [71] He does not appear in the 1897 directory. Nathan re-appears in Leadville in 1902 and 1903 at 115 E 3rd Street as a clerk at Famous Shoe and Clothing Co. After another absence in 1904, Nathan reappears in 1905 as a clerk for M. B. Miller with his residence again at the Hyman family household. His brother Henry died in 1904 and Nathan is identified in the funeral notice as “Nate”. [72] In his last year located in Leadville he is located at 309 Pine Street, employed as a clerk at Henry Issacs store. Nathan likely moved to Denver after 1909. He was located at 1532 Jackson Street in Denver in 1926. His later movements outside Leadville were not researched.

Henry H. Hyman

Sophie or Sophia Hyman

Mary (Hyman) Katz

Henry was born in 1885. He came to Leadville with his parents Levi and Sarah as a young child in 1889. He attended the Carbonate Hill School in 1892 with Kate R. Larson as teacher. [73] Henry was working in Pueblo shortly after high school when he returned home in early January, 1904. While at home at 115 East 3rd Street, he was suddenly taken ill with an unidentified sickness and died on the evening of January 9th. He was otherwise healthy and was 19 years old. The sickness Henry suffered from could have been typhoid given the swiftness of his passing compared to Henry’s previous health and youth. Other cities in the nation in 1904 experienced typhoid outbreaks [74] and the Colorado state health department issued a warning regarding the sickness in Lake County late in 1904. [75] There was a rumored outbreak in the Leadville suburb of Stringtown shortly after Henry’s death. [76] The funeral took place on January 11th at the family house on East 3rd Street and Henry was buried in the Hyman plot of the Hebrew Cemetery. [77]

According to the 1910 census, Sophie was born in Colorado in 1894, presumably in Leadville. She participated in a women’s club event in 1907 at the Carnegie library. [78] She left Leadville in 1910 for a job in Denver. [79] Sophie married a man named Harris sometime before 1918. By 1918, she had returned to Leadville where her estranged husband traveled from California to look for her. He alleged she had stolen money from him and the ensuing pursuit and legal difficulties were listed in a January, 1918, addition of the Herald Democrat. [80] The result is unknown, but she was still listed as Mrs. Sophia Harris in her mother’s obituary in 1926. The dispute had been resolved without a divorce.

According to the 1910 census, Mary was born in Missouri in 1888. She came to Leadville with the Hyman family in 1889. The Hyman’s lived at 115 East 3rd Street in 1910. Mary’s father Levi died in 1894. Soon after Levi’s death, Sarah remarried a man named Henry Barnett who lived at the residence with David, Sophie, and Mary Hyman (all biological children of Levi) along with a lodger named Jack Hannie. [81] Mary married Nathan Katz on October 21, 1906. The marriage did not last long. In May, 1911, she filed for divorce from Nathan on the grounds of desertion and non-support. It was reported that Nathan deserted her January 7, 1907, mere months after they were married. [82] The divorce was complete by May 16, 1911. [83] According to the 1920 census, she was married to Walter Moberg of Sweden and lived at 405 East 3rd Street. She is listed as “Mrs. Walter Moberg” as an attendee of her mother Sarah Barnett's funeral in 1926. [84] Mary was one of the last Hymns to stay in Leadville. She is listed in Leadville as Mary Moberg in both the 1920, 1930, and 1940 Federal census. [85] Walter died in 1947 and Mary stayed in Leadville until at least that year. [86]

1 Ancestry.com. U.S. Passport Applications

2 1879 Leadville City Directory

3 “List of Express Matter.” Leadville Daily/Evening Chronicle, Volume 1, Number 68, April 18, 1879 p 1

4 “Mining Notes” Leadville Weekly Democrat, Volume I, March 6, 1880 p 8

5 “Kokomo: Revival of Mining and Business Activity” Leadville, CO; USA. Leadville Weekly Democrat, Volume 2, April 2, 1881 p 3

6 “Personal Points” Leadville, CO; USA. Leadville Democrat, June 7, 1881 p 8

7 “In Ashes: Kokomo Visited by Disastrous Conflagration” Leadville, CO; USA. Leadville Weekly Democrat, Volume 2, October 15, 1881 p 1

8 “City Council” Leadville, CO; USA. Leadville Daily Herald, September 13, 1882 p 4

9 1882 Leadville City Directory p 68

10 “The Wise Men” Leadville, CO; USA. Leadville Daily Herald, December 27, 1882 p 1

11 “Electric Light” Leadville, CO; USA. Carbonate Chronicle, January 20, 1883 p 3

12 1883 Leadville City Directory pp. 61, 157, 274

13 “Sixth Annual Purim Ball” Leadville, CO; USA. Leadville Daily Herald, October 9, 1884 p 5

14 “A Banquet” Leadville, CO; USA. Leadville Daily Herald, March 22, 1883 p 1

15 “Distinguished Base-Ballers” Leadville, CO; USA. Carbonate Chronicle, March 17, 1883 p 3

16 “Sporting Notes” Leadville, CO; USA. Carbonate Chronicle, April 14, 1883 p 8

17 “Bat, Ball, and Base” Leadville, CO; USA. Leadville Daily Herald, March 28, 1883 p 4

18 Griswold 900

19 “A Resume” Leadville, CO; USA. Leadville Daily Herald, January 13, 1883 p 4

20 “Fancies” Leadville, CO; USA. Leadville Daily Herald, March 28, 1883 p 4

21 “Officer Steadman Horribly Beaten” Leadville, CO; USA. Carbonate Chronicle, October 13, 1883 p 7

22 “Happy Hyman” Leadville, CO; USA. Leadville Daily Herald, November 11, 1883 p 4

23 “A Petrified Stiff and Its Story” Leadville, CO; USA. Carbonate Chronicle, December 29, 1883 p 3

24 “Secrets of Success” Leadville, CO; USA. Leadville Daily Herald, December 16, 1883 p 4

25 1884 Leadville City Directory

26 “Everybody’s Column” Leadville, CO; USA. Leadville Daily Herald, January 12, 1884 p 2

27 “Happy Hyman” Leadville, CO; USA. Carbonate Chronicle, February 16, 1884 p 4

28 “Praise and Prayers” Leadville, CO; USA. Leadville Daily Herald, November 16, 1884 p 4

29 “Yesterday’s Shooting” Leadville, CO; USA. Leadville Daily Herald, August 20, 1884 p 4

30 “Holiday Shoots” Leadville, CO; USA. Carbonate Chronicle, August 23, 1884 p 2

31 “Holiday Bound Over” Leadville, CO; USA. Leadville Daily Herald, August 26, 1884 p 4

32 “The Laws Holiday” Leadville, CO; USA. Carbonate Chronicle, October 11, 1884 p 6

33 “The Veteran’s Meeting” Leadville, CO; USA. Leadville Daily Herald, October 9, 1884 p 4

34 “A Serious Collision” Leadville, CO; USA. Carbonate Chronicle, October 4, 1884 p 3

35 1885 Leadville City Directory

36 “Positive Facts” Leadville, CO; USA. Carbonate Chronicle, January 24, 1885 p 8

37 “The Lucerne” Leadville, CO; USA. Carbonate Chronicle, February 7, 1885 p 5

38 “He Is Very Crazy” Leadville, CO; USA. Carbonate Chronicle, January 24, 1885 p 4

39 “Oakley and Opium” Leadville, CO; USA. Carbonate Chronicle, January 17, 1885 p 1

40 “Congregation Israel” Leadville, CO; USA. Leadville Daily Herald, August 26, 1884 p 4

41 National Archives at Denver; Broomfield, Colorado; Naturalization Records, Colorado, 1876-1990; ARC Title: Naturalization Cards, 1880 - 1906; NAI Number: 1307044; Record Group Title: Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, 1787 - 2004; Record Group Number: 85

42 1886 Leadville City Directory

43 “Personal and Social” Leadville, CO; USA. Carbonate Chronicle, July 12, 1886 p 8

44 “Hyman-Goldman” Leadville, CO; USA. Herald Democrat, September 28, 1886 p 3

45 “The City” Leadville, CO; USA. Leadville Daily/Evening Chronicle, June 7, 1886 p 4

46 “Hohmann Is Here” Leadville, CO; USA. Carbonate Chronicle, May 24, 1886 p 5

47 “Illinois, Cook County Marriages, 1871–1920.” Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2010. Illinois Department of Public Health records. "Marriage Records, 1871–present." Division of Vital Records, Springfield, Illinois.

48 1887 Leadville City Directory

49 1888-1889 Leadville City Directory

50 “Rome was not built in a day” Leadville, CO; USA. Herald Democrat, July 31, 1887 p 1

51 Griswold 1898

52 “Advertisement” Leadville, CO; USA. Herald Democrat, November 2, 1887 p 2

53 “Building Movements” Leadville, CO; USA. Herald Democrat, June 1, 1890 p 8

54 Ancestry.com. Colorado, Divorce Index, 1851-1985 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.

55 United States Census 1920 (Hyman)

56 New York City Municipal Deaths 1924

57 “Another Voter” Leadville, CO; USA. Herald Democrat, March 23, 1890 p 4

58 “Society World” Herald Democrat, May 29, 1892 p

59 "Find A Grave Index," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QVVJ-2NM1 : 13 December 2015), Levi Hyman, 1896; Burial, Leadville, Lake, Colorado, United States of America, Hebrew Cemetery of Leadville; citing record ID 18472129, Find a Grave, http://www.findagrave.com.

60 “Police Court” Leadville, CO; USA. Herald Democrat, September 24, 1889 p 4

61 “Much Litigation and Bad Temper Between Barnetts and Millers” Leadville, CO; USA. Herald Democrat, March 28, 1902 p 8

62 1920 United States Census (Moberg)

63 “Mrs. Sarah Barnett” Leadville, CO; USA. Herald Democrat, March 26, 1926 p 4

64 “The February Roll of Honor for Lake County Public Schools” Herald Democrat, March 7, 1899 p 6 and “Leadville Public Schools Roll of Honor for January” Herald Democrat, February 11, 1900 p 5

65 Ancestry.com. U.S., World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.

66 “In Ports and Posts Everywhere Leadville Boys Answer Here” Leadville, CO; USA. Herald Democrat, January 1, 1919 p 17

67 “Furniture” Leadville, CO; USA. Herald Democrat, January 4, 1923 p 4

68 Ancestry.com. U.S., World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

69 “Entries” Leadville, CO; USA. Herald Democrat, July 1, 1890 p 5

70 1894 Leadville City Directory

71 1895 Leadville City Directory

72 “Death of Henry Hyman” Leadville, CO; USA. Herald Democrat, January 10, 1904 p 6

73 “Carbonate Hill School” Leadville, CO; USA. Herald Democrat, December 20, 1892 p 5

74 “Columbus Has Typhoid” Leadville, CO; USA. Herald Democrat, January 28, 1904 p 1

75 “Typhoid Danger” Twin Lakes, CO; USA. Twin Lakes Miner, September 17, 1904 p 2

76 “No Typhoid At Stringtown” Leadville, CO; USA. Herald Democrat, January 24, 1904 p 2

77 “Funeral Notice” Leadville, CO; USA. Herald Democrat, January 11, 1904 p 5

78 “Leadville’s Public Library” Leadville, CO; USA. Herald Democrat, January 1, 1907 p 26

79 “Personal Mention” Leadville, CO; USA. Herald Democrat, November 20, 1910 p 7

80 “Harris Wants Ticket To Leadville” Leadville, CO; USA. Herald Democrat, November 20, 1910 p 5

81 1910 United States Census (Barnett)

82 “Around the City” Herald Democrat, May 19, 1911 p 5

83 Ancestry.com. Colorado, Divorce Index, 1851-1985 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.

84 “Mrs. Sarah Barnett” Leadville, CO; USA. Herald Democrat, March 26, 1926 p 4

85 United States Census, 1920 (Moberg); United State Census, 1930 (Moberg); United States Census, 1940 (Moberg)

86 "Find A Grave Index," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QVGT-QKF1 : 13 December 2015), Walter Moberg, ; Burial, Leadville, Lake, Colorado, United States of America, Evergreen Cemetery; citing record ID 131483088, Find a Grave, http://www.findagrave.com.

Bibliography

 

 

Books:

Rochlin, Harriet and Fred. Pioneer Jews. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1984.

 

Blair, Edward. Leadville: Colorado’s Magic City. Boulder, CO: Pruett Publishing Company, 1980.

 

Griswold, Don L. Griswold and Jean Harvey. History of Leadville and Lake County, Colorado, Vol. I and II. Boulder, CO: Colorado Historical Society in cooperation with the University Press of Colorado, 1996.

 

Uchill, Ida. Pioneers, Peddlers, and Tsadikim. Denver, CO: Sage Books Publishing By Alan Swallow, 1957.

 

Breck, Allen duPont. The Centennial History of the Jews of Colorado 1859-1959. Denver, CO: The Hirschfeld Press, University of Denver Department of History Series, 1960.

 

 

Census and Archives:

"United States Census, 1920," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MJBR-PXF : accessed 9 July 2018), Manie Hyman in household of Anthony White, Manhattan Assembly District 15, New York, New York, United States; citing ED 1534, sheet 9A, line 14, family 80, NARA microfilm publication T625 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1992), roll 1214; FHL microfilm 1,821,214.

 

"New York, New York City Municipal Deaths, 1795-1949," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:2WLP-JX3 : 10 February 2018), Manie Hyman, 18 May 1924; citing Death, Manhattan, New York, New York, United States, New York Municipal Archives, New York; FHL microfilm 2,031,608.

 

Ancestry.com. U.S. Passport Applications, 1795-1925 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2007. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA); Washington D.C.; Roll #: 576; Volume #: Roll 576 - 09 May 1901-16 May 1901

 

United States, Selective Service System. World War I Selective Service System Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. M1509, 4,582 rolls. Imaged from Family History Library microfilm.

 

The National Archives at St. Louis; St. Louis, Missouri; World War II Draft Cards (Fourth Registration) for the State of Colorado; Record Group Title: Records of the Selective Service System, 1926-1975; Record Group Number: 147; Box or Roll Number: 066

 

"United States Census, 1920," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MX2B-W56 : accessed 16 July 2018), Walter Moberg, Leadville Ward 1, Lake, Colorado, United States; citing ED 80, sheet 3A, line 9, family 59, NARA microfilm publication T625 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1992), roll 165; FHL microfilm 1,820,165.

 

"United States Census, 1920," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MX2B-W5X : accessed 16 July 2018), Mary Moberg in household of Walter Moberg, Leadville Ward 1, Lake, Colorado, United States; citing ED 80, sheet 3A, line 10, family 59, NARA microfilm publication T625 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1992), roll 165; FHL microfilm 1,820,165.

 

United States Census, 1940," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VR6X-45V : accessed 16 July 2018), Mary Moberg, Election Precinct 7, Lake, Colorado, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 33-7, sheet 6B, line 57, family 145, Sixteenth Census of the United States, 1940, NARA digital publication T627. Records of the Bureau of the Census, 1790 - 2007, RG 29. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 2012, roll 466.

 

"United States Census, 1930," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X74C-7J5 : accessed 16 July 2018), Mary Moberg in household of Walter Moberg, Precinct 10, Lake, Colorado, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) ED 10, sheet 2A, line 8, family 37, NARA microfilm publication T626 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 2002), roll 244; FHL microfilm 2,339,979.

 

"United States Census, 1910," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MK4H-V1W : accessed 16 July 2018), Sarah R Barnet in household of Henry Barnet, Leadville Ward 1, Lake, Colorado, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) ED 68, sheet 2B, family 39, NARA microfilm publication T624 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1982), roll 121; FHL microfilm 1,374,134.

 

 

Directories:

WM Clark, WA Root And HC Anderson. “Clark, Root and Co’s First Annual City Directory of Leadville and Business Directory of Carbonateville, Kokomo and Malta for 1879”. Daily Times Steam Printing House And Book Manufactory; Denver, CO: USA. 1879.

 

Corbett, TB, Hoye, WC and Ballanger, JH. “Corbet, Hoye and Co’s First Annual City Directory: Containing A Complete List Of The Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms Etc. In The City Of Leadville For 1880”. Democrat Printing Company; Leadville, CO: USA. 1880.

 

Corbett, TB and Ballenger, JH “Corbet, and Ballenger’s Second Annual City Directory: Containing A Complete List Of The Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms Etc. In The City Of Leadville For 1881”. Corbet and Ballenger Publishers. 1881.

 

Corbett, TB and Ballanger, JH. “Corbet, and Ballenger’s Third Annual City Directory: Containing A Complete List Of The Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms Etc. In The City Of Leadville For 1882”. Corbet and Ballenger Publishers. 1882.

 

Corbett, TB and Balanger, JH. “Corbet, and Ballenger’s Fourth Annual City Directory: Containing A Complete List Of The Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms Etc. In The City Of Leadville For 1883”. Corbet and Ballenger Publishers. 1883.

 

Corbett, TB and Balanger, JH. “Corbet, and Ballenger’s Fifth Annual City Directory: Containing A Complete List Of The Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms Etc. In The City Of Leadville For 1884”. Corbet and Ballenger Publishers. 1884.

 

Corbett, TB and Ballanger, JH. “Corbet, and Ballenger’s Sixth Annual City Directory: Containing A Complete List Of The Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms Etc. In The City Of Leadville For 1885”. Corbet and Ballenger Publishers. 1885.

 

Corbett, TB and Ballenger, JH. “Corbet, and Ballenger’s Seventh Annual City Directory: Containing A Complete List Of The Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms Etc. In The City Of Leadville For 1886”. Corbet and Ballenger Publishers. 1886.

 

Corbett, TB and Balanger, JH. “Corbet, and Ballenger’s Eighth Annual City Directory: Containing A Complete List Of The Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms Etc. In The City Of Leadville For 1887”. Corbet and Ballenger Publishers. 1887.

 

Ballenger, JH and Richards. “Ballenger & Richard’s Ninth Annual City Directory: Containing A Complete List Of The Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms Etc. In The City Of Leadville For 1888”. Corbet and Ballenger and Richards Publishers. 1888.

 

Ballenger, JH and Richards. “Ballenger & Richard’s Tenth Annual City Directory: Containing A Complete List Of The Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms Etc. In The City Of Leadville For 1889”. Corbet and Ballenger and Richards Publishers. 1889.

 

Ballenger, JH and Richards. “Ballenger & Richard’s Eleventh Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Leadville for 1890”. Corbet and Ballenger and Richards Publishers. Leadville, CO; USA. 1890.

 

Ballenger, JH and Richards. “Ballenger & Richard’s Twelfth Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Leadville for 1891”. Corbet and Ballenger and Richards Publishers. Leadville, CO; USA. 1891.

 

Ballenger, JH and Richards. “Ballenger & Richard’s Thirteenth Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Leadville for 1892”. Corbet and Ballenger and Richards Publishers. Leadville, CO; USA. 1892.

 

Ballenger, JH and Richards. “Ballenger & Richard’s Fifteenth Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Leadville for 1894”. Corbet and Ballenger and Richards Publishers. Leadville, CO; USA. 1894.

 

Ballenger, JH and Richards. “Ballenger & Richard’s Sixteenth Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Leadville for 1895”. Corbet and Ballenger and Richards Publishers. Leadville, CO; USA. 1895.

 

Ballenger, JH and Richards. “Ballenger & Richard’s Eigteenth Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Leadville for 1897”. Corbet and Ballenger and Richards Publishers. Leadville, CO; USA. 1897.

 

Ballenger, JH and Richards. “Ballenger & Richard’s Nineteenth Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Leadville for 1898”. Corbet and Ballenger and Richards Publishers. Leadville, CO; USA. 1898.

 

Ballenger, JH and Richards. “Ballenger & Richard’s Twentieth Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Leadville for 1899”. Corbet and Ballenger and Richards Publishers. Leadville, CO; USA. 1899.

 

Ballenger, JH and Richards. “Ballenger & Richard’s Twenty-First Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Leadville for 1900”. Corbet and Ballenger and Richards Publishers. Leadville, CO; USA. 1900.

 

Ballenger, JH and Richards. “Ballenger & Richard’s Twenty-Second Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Leadville for 1901”. Corbet and Ballenger and Richards Publishers. Leadville, CO; USA. 1901.

 

Ballenger, JH and Richards. “Ballenger & Richard’s Twenty-Third Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Leadville for 1902”. Corbet and Ballenger and Richards Publishers. Leadville, CO; USA. 1902.

 

Ballenger, JH and Richards. “Ballenger & Richard’s Twenty-Fourth Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Leadville for 1903”. Corbet and Ballenger and Richards Publishers. Leadville, CO; USA. 1903.

 

Ballenger, JH and Richards. “Ballenger & Richard’s Twenty-Fifth Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Leadville for 1904”. Corbet and Ballenger and Richards Publishers. Leadville, CO; USA. 1904.

 

Ballenger, JH and Richards. “Ballenger & Richard’s Twenty-Sixth Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Leadville for 1905”. Corbet and Ballenger and Richards Publishers. Leadville, CO; USA. 1905.

 

Ballenger, JH and Richards. “Ballenger & Richard’s Twenty-Seventh Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Leadville for 1906”. Corbet and Ballenger and Richards Publishers. Leadville, CO; USA. 1906.

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