Biography
Levy
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Sol Levy
Born: 1835
Died: Leadville, October 20, 1882
Re-interred: Home of Peace Memorial Park, Los Angeles, California, August 8, 1926

Babette Halff Levy
Born: France, May 10, 1844
Died: Los Angeles, California, February 12, 1926

Irma Levy (Cohen)
Born: Galveston, Texas, January 20, 1870
Died: Los Angeles, California, September 23, 1937

Otto Jacque Levy
Born: Galveston, Texas, November 14, 1871
Died: Los Angeles, California, April 15, 1959
Interred: Linn Grove Cemetery, Greely, Colorado.

Cora Levy (Rothschild)
Born: Galveston, Texas, July 7, 1876
Died: San Francisco, California, April 26, 1977

Rene S. Levy
Born: Houston, Texas, September 3, 1877
Died: Houston, Texas, March 15, 1946

Lilly Rose Levy (Schnitzer)
Born: Leadville, March 21, 1879
Died: Houston, Texas, May 30, 1968

Sol Levy arrived in the United States from Le Harve, France, aboard the John Hancock, on December 30, 1854, at New Orleans. His wife, Babette Halff, is not listed on the passenger manifest, but it is likely they met before he departed France, her native country. Also, aboard the ship were sixteen-year-old Jim Levy, and nineteen-year-old Melanie Levy, [1] who may have been relations to Sol. Sol Levy and Babette Halff were married at St. Landry, Louisiana, on April 26, 1860. [2]

The Solomon Levy family likely arrived in Leadville during 1878, from Galveston, Texas. The youngest of the Levy children, Lily Rose, was born in Leadville during March of 1879, [3] prior to the arrival of Leadville’s first railroad, the Denver and Rio Grande, which opened for passenger travel on July 22, 1880. [4] Travel to Leadville at this time was quite strenuous, and it is unlikely, though hardly impossible, that Babette Levy would have made this trip while pregnant. The first record of the family is a notice for a letter awaiting Sol at the Leadville post office on May 28, 1879. [5] The first listing for Sol in the Leadville city directory shows his pawnshop at 208 Harrison Avenue where he also resided with his family. [6] In an article that demonstrated that the city of Leadville had collected over $100,000 in business licensing fees in 1880, it was noted that Sol paid $75 in fees for his loan office. It is not completely certain if all of the children were with the Levy’s when they arrived in Leadville as they are not enumerated in the 1880 United States Census. [8] It is reasonably sure that Lily was in Leadville during 1880 and records show that some of the Levy children attended Leadville schools in the years to follow, however their arrival in Leadville is speculative as there are no records for any of the children, except Lily, before 1881.

During Sol’s brief time in Leadville, he was popular with other locals, deeply involved in local mining investments in addition to his pawn and jewelry enterprise, and spent a fair amount of time in the courts, as both a plaintiff and a defendant, named in various suits. During 1880, Sol separated his business from his residence; the pawnshop remained at 208 Harrison Avenue, but he moved his family to a new abode at 214 East Chestnut street. [9] On May 17, Sol attended a grand reception [10] in honor of local clothier Joe Schoenberg. [11]

The following advertisement for an auction at Sol’s pawn shop appeared in the August 7, 1880, edition of the Leadville Daily Herald:

Auction Sale. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). Saturday, August 7, 1880. Page 1.

Auction Sale. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). Saturday, August 7, 1880. Page 1.

On April 7, 1881, it appears that there was trouble afoot with the brokers employed by the Leadville Mining and Stock Exchange, of which Sol served as an officer, and the schism was resolved on April 7, 1881:

…The threatened rupture between the original incorporators of the Leadville Mining Stock exchange, and a score of the principal brokers doing business in the exchange, has been amicably settled, and will result in a reorganization of the board on a mutual plan. The following agreement has been ratified, and an election of officers will occur this evening.

The committee appointed from the Leadville Mining and Stock exchange, and the brokers thereof met for the adjustment of the differences existing between those bodies, and the adoption of a plan based upon mutual benefit to both sides.

The meeting took place in the office of John J. McGowan, and upon coming to business, Mr. Sol Levy was elected chairman of the meeting, and John J. McGowan, secretary… [12]

Good Advice. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). Saturday, October 23, 1880. Page 4.

Good Advice. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). Saturday, October 23, 1880. Page 4.

The following article appeared in the September 11, 1880 edition of the Carbonate Chronicle newspaper:

CROOKED COOPER

Interviewed by a Chronicle Reporter at The Jail.

He Says He Has Done Wrong and Will Tell All.

Probability that His Case Will be Compromised.

Marshal Watson arrived on the 9 o’clock train last night, having in custody Moses Cooper. [13] The absconding clerk of David Loeb. [14] A CHRONCILE reporter called at the county jail, where the prisoner is confined, this morning, and through the courtesy of Jailor Miller was introduced to Mr. Cooper, who is a man about thirty years of age, or maybe a little older, and evidently of Jewish extraction; he is about five feet seven inched high, dark complexion with a bright, intelligent face, large dark eyes, and withal a very pleasant address; but he carries on his person one peculiarity that would mark him unmistakably among a thousand men, and is a large red spot on his temple, apparently a birth mark.

THE INTERVIEW.

Reporter-“Mr. Cooper, one side of this affair in which you are so vitally interested having been published, THE CHRONICLE desires to give you an opportunity to be heard.”

Mr. Cooper-“My dear sir, I thank you for the interest you take, and I know it is nothing more than right that the public should know the facts, but I do not know that I have any statement to make at present; and I would have greatly preferred, on account of my family and friends in the East, that the unfortunate affair had not appeared in the papers at all; besides, the Denver papers have so grossly misrepresented me that I prefer not to make a statement for publication.

Rep.: “The dark side of your case having already been published, a statement of your version of the matter can do you no harm.”

Mr. Cooper: “That is true. I will simply say that I have done wrong. I am sorry for it, and I intend to tell the whole truth; and when I get a chance to see my friends, I shall try to settle the matter, and then I will have no objection to making a full statement.”

At this time Marshal Watson appeared and conducted the prisoner to the store of Mr. Loeb, where a long private conference was held, the result of which our reporter was unable to obtain. Mr. Cooper, it appears, was in the habit of occasionally selling watches and jewelry on commission, for Mr. Levy, the pawnbroker on Harrison Avenue, and Mr. Hauser, [15] the jeweler on Chestnut street.

These gentlemen were then hunted up, and it was learned from Mr. Hauser that Mr. Cooper had frequently sold goods for him on commission, and that he had on every occasion been perfectly square in his transactions, that a day or two before he left, Mr. Cooper came to him and told him he had a customer to whom he could sell a watch. Mr. Hauser as usual gave him a gold watch and chain, valued at $118, to sell. He met Mr. Cooper on the street, the night before is disappearance, with the watch and chain still in his possession. Mr. Cooper explained that he had not been able to see his customer, but that he would see him the next day and effect the trade. It is unnecessary to state that the watch was not sold, but is now in the possession of Marshal Watson.

Mr. Levy was next found, and our reporter learned that he had left with Mr. Cooper a gold watch and three diamond rings valued at $500, which he was to sell on commission. As soon as Mr. Cooper’s disappearance became known, Mr. Loeb at once began to investigate the matter, and soon ascertained that the watch and two diamond rings had been pawned to Judge Pendery, the other ring was found on the prisoner when arrested. Those gentlemen are now interested in getting back their property. It seems that Marshal Watson has been served with a garnishee process, by Mr. Eshelmann [Eshelman], to prevent him giving up the property that was taken from Cooper when he was arrested, in order to secure indebtedness due from the prisoner to Eshelman.

It is said Cooper is interested in some mining property and also owns a part interest in a saloon, and that he will escape state prison, as it is understood the parties most interested have signified their willingness to effect [affect] a compromise.

It is said that fast women and wine have been the prime causes of this unfortunate young man’s deviation from rectitude. [16]

On November 3, 1880, the following endorsement appeared in the Leadville Daily Herald newspaper:

Among the Leading Houses. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). Wednesday, November 3, 1880. Page 4.

Among the Leading Houses. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). Wednesday, November 3, 1880. Page 4.

On December 15, 1880, Babette attended the birthday party for Mrs. I.D. Campbell in her suite at 204 Harrison Avenue, [17] which was listed as the Cooper & Worth saloon in the 1880 Leadville city directory. [18] On December 19, the following item appeared in the Leadville Daily Herald:

Presentation. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). Sunday, December 19, 1880. Page 4.

Presentation. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). Sunday, December 19, 1880. Page 4.

This advertisement appeared in the December 24, 1880 edition of the Leadville Daily Herald.

Now!!! (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). Friday, December 24, 1880. Page 1.

Now!!! (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). Friday, December 24, 1880. Page 1.

On January 26, 1881, Babette attended the wedding of Rosa Schloss [19] to Morris Altman [20] where she gave a gift of a set of wine glasses to the newlyweds. [21] On April 9, then president of the Western Union Consolidated Mining Company, Sol Levy, gave notice to the public that the organization’s stock would be cancelled in concert with its pending dissolution. [22] On March 23, Sol purchased one-sixteenth of the Murry Lode from John Coleman for the consideration of $1. [23]

A notice in the Leadville Daily Herald Mines and Real Estate section advertised a new enterprise on February 27, 1881, of which Sol was a founding member:

Mines And Real Estate. (Leadville, CO: The Daily Democrat). Sunday, February 27, 1881. Page 3.

Mines And Real Estate. (Leadville, CO: The Daily Democrat). Sunday, February 27, 1881. Page 3.

On April 12, 1881, the Leadville Mining and Stock Exchange met to elect officers. The board had a few notable Colorado mining moguls present, such as Horace Tabor, [24] who was elected president, and Charles Boettcher. [25] In addition, prominent Jewish businessman, Joseph Monheimer, [26] was elected vice president and Sol Levy was chosen for the position of trustee. [27]

Watches. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). Sunday, April 17, 1881. Page 1.

Watches. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). Sunday, April 17, 1881. Page 1.

Sol Levy was elected treasurer of the Atlantic and Pacific Mining and Tunnel Company at the organization’s first annual meeting on April 29, 1881. [28] In December, Sol became one of the founding members of the Colorado Consolidated Mining and Tunnel Company which bound together twelve mining claims in the Ten Mile Mining district for which he served in the role of treasurer. The organization was capitalized with a reported $4,000,000. [29]

On January 31, 1882, Sol and local Jewish liquor distributor, Adolph Baer, [30] were indicted on charges of larceny. The charges were almost immediately dismissed and the details of the actual complaint were not recorded. [31]

On February 3, 1882, Sol’s pawn shop was one of several businesses to participate in a promotional raffle; patrons were encouraged to spend twentyfive cents at the Monarch Saloon and then earned one of thirty two thousand tickets, the prizes to be awarded by a group of local merchants; [32] Sol contributed: a diamond ring; a watch and a gold-headed cane from Goldstein [33] & Brodie’s; [34] a silk dress from Monheimer Bros.; [35] a diamond stud from Dan Golding; [36] a meerschaum pipe from Thorne & Schaeffer’s; a gentleman’s saddle from Becker & Leonard’s; a ladies’ dolman from Daniels, Fisher & Smith’s; and “…one elegent bound volume of Dickens’ works…” from John Leinenger’s (book store). [37] On May 9, Sol was elected “money broker” at the annual meeting of the Colorado Consolidated Mining and Tunnel Company. [38]

On June 5, 1882, Ida Beaupre was jailed in lieu of $1,200 in bonds regarding jewelry she allegedly stole from Sol. [39] On June 15, a notice appeared in the Leadville Daily Herald reporting on a court case C.F. Daily vs. Sol Levy had been continued to June 23 and required costs for the continuance were to be paid by Daily. [40] On July 15, a mention in a local newspaper noted that Sol was “…re-painting and re-papering his storeroom, and otherwise “brushing up” a bit…” [41] On August 29, the local Jewish community hosted an evening with Reverend Dr. Sonenshine. Sol gave the following toast during the evening’s festivities: “Our distinguished guests, may they live long and enjoy their visit to Leadville.” [42]

On October 18, 1882, Sol and Babette attended the lavish reception for the wedding of Lewis Lyon and Rachel Jonas. [43] Several historic local celebrities such as Colorado Lt. Governor Horace Tabor, who donated the land for Temple Israel in 1884, and agricultural, mining and concrete magnate, Charles Boettcher appeared. In addition, a sizeable number of Leadville’s Jewish elite were also present. [44]

Despite Sol’s attendance at the Lyon’s wedding a few days prior, on October 19, 1882, Sol enjoyed most of the day, but as evening fell, he complained of a severe headache:

At Rest.

Probably no man in the city was better known than Mr. Sol Levy, the proprietor of the loan office on Harrison avenue. His genial smiles have been more than once cheered his friends, while the poor and afflicted have as often been relieved by his assistance. Last Friday afternoon Mr. Levy was attacked with severe pains in his head and up to yesterday evening he appeared to be quite cheerful, but as the night advanced the disease, crysipeins [45] , took an alarming turn and at a quarter past two o’clock this morning he passed away.

Mr. Levy was a Bavarian by birth and was fifty-two years of age. He came to this country over twenty years ago, and was one of the pioneers of Leadville. His business schemes have been very successful here, and he leaves his family, which consists of a wife and five children, in comparatively easy circumstances. A large circle of friends will mourn the loss of the affectionate husband, kind father and happy friend. [46]

The funeral for Sol Levy was held on October 27, 1882, followed by his burial in Leadville’s Hebrew Cemetery. [47]

On November 9, the following notice appeared in the Leadville Daily Herald newspaper:

Notice. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). Thursday, November 9, 1882. Page 4.

Notice. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). Thursday, November 9, 1882. Page 4.

On December 18, 1882, Babette announced a holiday sale of a “…large stock of gold and silver watches, diamonds and jewelry. Also a small portion of the old stock still on hand…”. [48]

Executrix Notice. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). Wednesday, January 3, 1883. Page 3.

Executrix Notice. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). Wednesday, January 3, 1883. Page 3.

On December 27, Babette announced that Sol Levy’s Jewelry store would close for business permanently on January 1, 1883. [49] Evidence demonstrates that Babette continued some form of operation, likely selling off store fixtures and superfluous household items, at the 208 Harrison location, through at least January of 1883, as shown by the following classified advertisement that appeared in the January 14, 1883 edition of the Leadville Daily Herald:

For Sale. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). Sunday, January 14, 1883. Page 4.

For Sale. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). Sunday, January 14, 1883. Page 4.

On January 8, 1883, Babette announced that she had sold Sol’s jewelry business to Fanny Cohn, [50] any outstanding loans would be auctioned off, and those wishing to renew their contracts could enquire with the Cohn pawnshops. [51] On January 11, it was reported that the Bay City Tunnel, a property partially owned by Babette, had uncovered a new substantial vein of silver. [52]

On January 30, 1883, the courts began hearing the case of Ida Beaupre, accused of taking jewelry from Sol’s store in June of 1882. The outcome is unknown, though the defense argued for the judge to throw out any testimony from Sol; as he was deceased, he could not be presented for cross-examination, nor could he be interrogated on the stand. Jurors were dismissed for this debate, which took the better part of the day. [53] A curious note to this case is that in early October of 1882, Ida Beaupre sued Sol in county court, likely a retaliatory measure stemming from Sol’s complaint that Ms. Beaupre had stolen goods from his store. [54]

On October 6, 1883, Babette attended the wedding reception for Sol Rice [55] where she gifted a silver toilet set to the happy couple. [56] On October 20, Babette’s name appeared on a post office notice for unclaimed mail [57] though she clearly remained in Leadville as at least a part-time resident until 1893. [58]

In 1884, the Levy family residence is listed as 323 W. 4th Street. Curiously, this is the only Leadville generated documentation of Babette that makes any reference to her actual first name, listing her as “Levy, B. Mrs.”. [59]

On January 10, 1884, Babette attended a scheduled meeting of The Coffee and Tea Party Club [60] at the home of Anna Herman. [61] On March 31, a Sheriff’s notice appeared in the Leadville Daily Herald that reported the sale of Babette’s interest in Lot 23, Block 5 of the St. Louis Smelting and Refining Company’s addition to the city of Leadville to cover a $112.00 judgement in the favor of Lewis Hebner. [62] Babette attended the Strawberries & Ice Cream Festival hosted by the Hebrew Ladies Benevolent Society at Armory Hall on June 20, 1884. [63] Both Irma and Babette were present for the sixth annual Ladies’ Hebrew Benevolent Association Ball at City Hall on October 8, 1884. [64]

Irma Levy was apparently a popular and socially active teenager; she was a member of the C. C. C. club, and attended their meeting held in Dr. Dougan’s home at 120 West 4th Street on March 15, 1884. [65] Irma appeared at a meeting of the Talented Ten at the home of Susie Marston on April 9. [66] She would also attend a taffy pull hosted by Miss Eilel [67] on June 13. [68]

Page 161 of the 1884 Leadville City Directory showing the Levy surnames.

Page 161 of the 1884 Leadville City Directory showing the Levy surnames.

Corbett and Ballenger. Leadville, Colorado; USA. 1884. Page 161.

On September 19, 1884, Irma served as an alto in the Congregation Israel Choir for Rosh Hoshana services and the Temple Israel Synagogue building dedication that same evening. [69] She would perform in the same capacity for the Shabbat Tshuva [70] observance on the evening of October 3. [71] On October 4, 1884, a mention in the personals column noted that Irma Levy would soon be leaving Leadville to attend school in Canada. [72] On November 13, a pending suit, Solomon Levy V. Moses Cooper was dismissed by Judge Gunneil. [73] The nature of the suit and the cause for dismissal are unknown.

In 1885 Babette moved her family to 417 W. 4th Street. [74] Babette was sued by one of Sol’s partners, S.N. Dwight, in Leadville on April 2 and Dwight was awarded $1,753.53 which was then appealed to the Supreme Court. [75] This case, which began when Dwight sued Sol in 1882, would continue on for at least a decade before the Supreme Court sent it back to the lower court and eventually was retried on March 18, 1893. [76]

Cora Levy won the spelling bee for the lower grade held at the Ninth Street School on March 12, 1885, and appeared on the institution’s honor roll later that month. [77] Irma attended the Simchath Torah Ball presented by the Hebrew Ladies’ Aid Society on September 25 at City Hall. [78]

Babette was the president of the Ladies’ Hebrew Benevolent Society during 1884-85. [79]

On March 21, 1885, the property at Block 5, Lot 22, of the St. Louis Smelting and Refining Company addition to the city of Leadville, jointly owned by Babette, Amos Miller and William O’Conner, was ordered to be sold by the sheriff to satisfy a suit brought by Lewis Hefner in the amount of $201.46. [80] Babette served on the arrangement committee for the Hebrew Children’s Mask Ball at Armory Hall on May 8, 1885. Otto, Lilly, and Cora were in attendance. [81] In July, Cora was a part of the closing ceremonies for the St. George Parish School, performing a dialog entitled “Buying Toys”, and finishing the academic year on the primary classes’ honor roll. [82]

Babette and the Levy children relocated to Denver in 1886 at 623 Curtis Street. [83] She would continue to visit Leadville regularly over the next decade to tend to Sol’s business concerns and visit friends. In July and August of 1887, for example, Babette spent three weeks in Leadville visiting friends. [84] Eighteen-year-old Otto J. Levy transmitted a quit claim deed to Cora Rothschild bestowing one third of the Gertrude claim for the consideration of one dollar on November 11, 1889. [85]

On August 4, 1891, Babette’s signature appeared on a petition signed by a great number of Lake County taxpayers, protesting a $60,000.00 bond paid to county attorney D. E. Parks for services rendered:

…The question of giving permission to try and set aside the Parks judgement for $60,000 was then brought up, and Mr. J. M. Maxwell. On behalf of a large number of taxpayers and citizens addressed the board substantially as follows:

…Mr. Parks receives judgment for twice the amount already granted, the people will feel satisfied and have a better feeling toward the commissioners. “I do not say that there has been any crooked work done, but I do say that a larger fee has been paid to Mr. Parks than he is entitled to.” The speaker believed the board would have acted otherwise if it had heard the other side of the story, and the conclusion arrived at would have been different.

Mr. Maxwell the read the following petition and names attached:

To the Honorable the Board of County Commissioners of Lake County, Colorado:

GENTLEMAN-Your petitioners, all of whom are taxpayers in said county, respectfully ask your honorable body to endeavor to set aside the judgment lately obtained by D. E. Parks against said county, for the sum of $60,000, and to cancel the bonds issued in payment of same:…

[Babette’s signature appears here among 304 individual names. In the interest of condensing this article, only the Jewish names are transcribed here]

Joseph Miller [86]
Isaac Kahn [87]
B. Leppel
Baer Bros.
J.S. Miller
A. Baer [88]
S. Baer
Baer & Mayer
M. Mayer [89]
Mrs. B. Levy
J.F. Witkowski [90]
G. Janowitz [91]
I. Grossmayer [92]
Henry Ludwig [93]

M. Leppel [94]
M. Londoner [95]
E. Arkush
Jacob Schloss [96]
Lottie Stern [97]
J.S. Sandusky [98]
Henry Angerman [99]
David May [100]
J.H. Monheimer [101]
Sands Bros. [102]
Adolph Schayer [103]
Strauss & Co. [104]
Ben Davies [105]
Sam Berry & Co. [106]

…Mr. Maxwell and Mr. Taylor then discussed a legal point, after which Commissioner Allingham moved that the board take the matter under consideration until Thursday evening, August 6. Messrs. Allingham and Verhofsted voted in the affirmative and Messrs. Pierce and Sullivan in the negative. The chairman voted aye.

The board then adjourned until Thursday evening. [107]

On October 10, 1891, Babette attended an afternoon tea hosted by Bertha Berry [108] at her home. [109]

On April 27, 1893, leasees of the Alma Lode, partially owned by Sol’s estate, began work on a shaft they intended to sink fifty feet. [110] On June 2, the case of Dwight V. Levy was finally decided in the Levy’s favor. This, of course, followed a decade of litigation and reached its climax nearly eleven years after Sol’s death:

An Old Case Settled

The only case of importance in the district court yesterday was that of S. N. Dwight vs. Sol Levy. The case has been sent to the supreme court once and was remanded for a new trial. It is claimed by Dwight that he loaned Levy $1425, and took as collateral security 4,500 shares of Brittenstein mining stock was sold to Dwight for $1500 within thirty days. Soon after the stock was placed in Dwight’s hands the company failed and the stock was consequently worthless. Dwight then brought suit to recover $1,425, with interest from date of loan. The jury found in favor of defendants [Levy]. The case was a rather knotty and complicated one, owing to the death of Levy, which closed the mouth of the plaintiff as to the nature of the transaction between the two. A number of documents were submitted, one, especially, being an agreement or note, which might or might not be a promissory note, as the jury chose to interpret it. [111]

Although this essentially uncovered the shroud of mystery that seemed to surround the case, this still did not finalize the business between S. N. Dwight and Babette. On June 29, 1893, Dwight attempted once again to revive interest from the judiciary in his antiquated case:

AN OLD DECISION REVIVED

A Case of Eleven Years Standing Brought

Up for Airing in the District Court.

S. N. Dwight, in the district court yesterday, through his attorneys, Blake and Sayer, of Denver, filed a motion for a new trial in the case entitled “S.N.Dwight vs. Babette Levy, administrix of the estate of Sol Levy, deceased.” This action revives the case which first came before the county court of Lake county in the year 1882, brought by plaintiff to recover from defendant Sol Levy the sum of $1,500. Defendant was at that time engaged extensively in business in Leadville and is alleged to have borrowed the some of $1,425 from plaintiff for thirty days, agreeing to return the loan when due, together with interest in the sum of $75. According to the complaint, however, the defendant failed to meet the obligation, and upon airing the case in the county court a verdict was returned in favor of the plaintiff for the recovery of $1,465.35. Defendant appealed from the judgement of the county court, and a jury in the district court, of which P.J. Quigly was chairman, reversed the decision of the lower court, returning the following verdict: “We the jury, find the issues herein joined for the defendant.”

Now the plaintiff comes forward and asks for a new trial, taking the stand that the evidence was insufficient to justify the verdict, and that the verdict was contrary to law and unsupported by the evidence. The case will probably be heard in the district court on Friday. [112]

As late as March 3, 1896, the case reappeared. At this time Judge Owers decided to clear old cases from the district court docket. Which finally settled the dust from a proceeding that seemed destined to continue in perpetuity. [113]

It is unknown when Babette left Leadville behind permanently, but records for her delinquent taxes on Lot 23 of the St. Louis Smelting and Refining Company section of the city appear as late as October 12, 1903. [114]

Babette died of unknown causes in California on February 12, 1926, and was interred at Home of Peace Memorial Park in East Los Angeles. [115] Shortly afterwards, Sol was removed from his gravesite at Leadville’s Hebrew Cemetery and reinterred by Babette’s side. [116] On September 25, 1930, Sol was honored during a special Yahrzeit service at Hebrew Union College in Cincinatti, Ohio, that recognized the institution’s original endowers whom had passed. [117]

Henry Levy
Born: Germany, 1846
Died:

Emma Levy
Born: Germany, 1856
Died:

Records show that sometime in 1879 Henry and Emma lived briefly at Robinson’s Camp, located in the Ten Mile mining district, roughly nineteen miles north of Leadville, and came from parts unknown. The first mention of the couple living within the Leadville city limits came from the Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle in late June of 1879:

Henry’s listed occupation in the 1880 United States Census is “Miner”, Emma is shown in the same document listed as a “Housekeeper”, [118] both living at 107 Harrison Avenue. Curiously, a number of other Leadville residents occupy this address with Henry listed at its head. Their 220 Harrison Avenue address in 1881 was clearly a boarding house maintained by the Levy’s, but it was also the location of a local pub, St. Anne’s Rest, which was at this time operated by Daniel Shaw. [119]

On October 22, 1882, Henry and Emma attended the lavish reception for the wedding of Lewis Lyon to Rachel Jonas. Several historic local celebrities such as Colorado Lt. Governor Horace Tabor, who donated the land for Temple Israel in 1884, and agricultural, mining and concrete magnate Charles Boettcher appeared at the event as well. In addition, a sizeable number of Leadville’s Jewish elite were also present. [120]

Henry and Emma attended a party hosted by David and Rosa May [121] at their home on November 25, 1883. [122]

Records in Leadville for Henry and Emma are rather scarce, but the couple likely remained in Leadville until at least 1884, having attended the Simchath Torahs Ball at City Hall on October 10 of that year. [123]

Preparing for Winter. (Leadville, CO: The Daily Chronicle). Monday, June 30, 1879. Page 4.

Preparing for Winter. (Leadville, CO: The Daily Chronicle). Monday, June 30, 1879. Page 4.

Albert M. Levy
Born: Le Harve, France, 1859
Died: Colma, California, December 14, 1895

L. Lee Levy
Born: Le Harve, France, December 23, 1859
Died: Cincinnati, Ohio, 1918

Belle Levy
Born: 1865
Died: Cincinnati, Ohio, June 6, 1946

Albert Levy likely came to Leadville from Ohio in 1879. [124] Though he is unlisted in the city directory, an unclaimed letter appears for Albert at the post office on July 31, 1879. Records for Albert are difficult to extract as he sometimes appears as Albert or Aron M. Levy. The existence of a separate Albert M. Levy in Leadville adds to the complexity of identifying records both locally and nationally. This Albert M. Levy was a clothier and brother to longtime Leadville resident, Henrietta Sonnenberg, and Leadville horseman Lee Levy. Both Lee and Albert lived in Henrietta’s home [125] at 130 E. 3rd Street at times. [126] The first mention of Lee Levy in Leadville was in the 1881 city directory as a “bottle dealer” living at 113 W. 4th street. [127] Lee was not enumerated in the 1885 Special Colorado State Census, but is listed in the 1885 Leadville city directory living in the Sonnenberg home. [128] This leads one to speculate as to whether the members of this family arrived at separate times. Both Al and Lee have the same birth year, though without a specific birth date for Al, it is unclear if the brothers were twins. Their link to Le Harve, France, could also indicate that there was a possible familial connection to Sol and Babette Levy. [129]

On June 22, 1882, Lee was tried and acquitted on charges of the larceny of a saddle. Judge Rose took testimony from the involved parties and honorably discharged Levy:

The case of the people vs. L. Levy, charged with the larceny of a saddle, came up for trial yesterday in Judge Rose’s court, and upon hearing the testimony the case was dismissed and the defendant [Levy] honorably discharged. [130]

During 1883, Lee was listed in the city directory as a “saloonkeeper” still living in the Sonnenberg home, Al was unlisted. [131]

On August 5, 1884, the Leadville Daily Herald noted that Albert was moving his business to Denver. [132] This is an interesting note as Albert was connected to Herman Strauss for the entirety of his time in both Leadville and Denver between 1880 and 1894. Albert is enumerated in the 1885 Colorado state census, still living with sister Henrietta Sonnenberg, in Leadville, [133] however he also appears in the 1885 Denver city directory as a clerk for Herman Strauss. [134] It is somewhat unclear whether Albert was a partner of Strauss, or simply an employee. Albert returned to Leadville in 1891, [135] still working with the Strauss clothing outlet, while maintaining his own residence at 610 Harrison Avenue. [136] Albert has few mentions in newspapers, and is often accounted for in both Denver and Leadville directories, simultaneously at times, suggesting he was not a full-time resident of either city but rather split time between both cities on a somewhat regular basis.

In 1885, Lee was listed in the city directory in the occupation of “Horse Trader”. [137] On November 27, Lee was involved in a court case surrounding a second-hand bridle he claimed to have purchased. Ultimately Judge Rose awarded the property to Levy:

All About A Bridle. (Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle). Saturday, November 28, 1885. Page 8.

All About A Bridle. (Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle). Saturday, November 28, 1885. Page 8.

Belle Levy first appears in Leadville records at the Purim Masque Ball, costumed as a “Madame”, on March 24, 1886. [138] Lee [139] and Belle were guests at the eleventh wedding anniversary celebration for Richard and Rachel Metz [140] at their home on April 13, 1886. [141] On July 12, Lee answered to charges of “breach of the peace” for an unknown incident and was acquitted in a session of the police court. [142]

During 1889, Lee was connected to the suicidal death of Lena Rupenthal, whom he allegedly met while she was employed at the Hutchinson House in Leadville. A third party, Kate Maynard, Rupenthal’s Denver landlady, claimed that Rupenthal testified that: “…he [Lee Levy] make all kinds of advances at me, but, as I was employed at the Hutchinson House, I would have nothing to do with him”. It was then claimed that Levy overpowered Rupenthal, much to her objections while claiming that she may have lost consciousness. Rupenthal further reported that, “I do not know whether I was drugged or not”. A few months later, Rupenthal learned that she was pregnant. Rupenthal bore a child in Maynard’s front room and Levy ostensibly paid all expenses. Maynard further claimed that at one point Levy proclaimed that he would marry Rupenthal and raise the child, but as time passed he became more reluctant, finally offering Rupenthal $200 to “…lay aside all claims to him”. Maynard also claimed that Rupenthal was a morphine addict, who at times was impossible to wake.

One Harry Hull, a “sporty boy” from New York, visited Leadville in 1891. Soon after his arrival, his funds ran short, and in anticipation of a check which would soon arrive from New York, he began to indebt himself to local merchants for cash loans and credit. One of these merchants being Albert Levy, who on the presumption of promised funds, allowed Hull to acquire a fur hat from the Strauss stockpile. [144] No further information as to the resolution for the Rupenthal or Hull cases has been found.

On March 17, 1892 , Lee and Belle attended dinner with Mr. and Mrs. Cary. [145] Lee also served on the reception committee for the Simchat Torahs Ball on October 18. [146] During 1892, Albert moved his home to 610 Harrison Avenue. [147] Albert swore out a warrant for the arrest of Dan Ryan (A.K.A.: John McMahon) for burglary and larceny in district court on August 22, 1892. Details of Ryan’s infraction are not available; however, bail was set at $1000. [148]

During November of 1893, Al was a principal witness to an incident at the Herman Strauss clothing store where he was employed:

John McEachern is again a free man. His case is a most peculiar one. One evening in August a man named Dolan, who was under the influence of liquor, was knocked down in the alley at the rear of the Rio Grande city ticket office, on West Fourth Street, and robbed of some money and a Busk tunnel time check of $59.20. There was no clue to the hold-up, but the day following a man walked into Strauss’s clothing store, and, buying a coat, handed Mr. Strauss a time check made out and endorsed as “Dolan.” The same man had several times before bought goods at the store, so Mr. Strauss took the amount of his bill, and gave back the remainder, $55.20, due his customer, in cash. The sale was made immediately after the store opened, and, after his customer left, Mr. Strauss picked up the morning’s Herald Democrat and read the account of the robbery of the night before. He at once looked for his man, but the latter had disappeared, and when the check was taken to the bank the endorsement of “Dolan” was pronounced a forgery. Early last month the police spied a man who answered the description of the fellow who had passed the check. He was arrested and gave his name as John McEachern, and was identified by Mr. (Al) Levy, and employee of the store. McEachern’s case was set for trial, and ever since that time a lookout has been kept for Mr. Dolan, the man who first held the check, but that gentleman has disappeared. It was impossible for the prosecution to make any case without Mr. Dolan as a witness, as there is no proof that McEachern stole the check, so in order to save the county further expenses, the district attorney decided to release McEachern upon the proposition made by his friends, which was for him to pay Mr. Strauss the $55.20. The money was paid over to Judge Wall yesterday and was handed to Mr. Strauss last evening, who regards the return of the cash as a miracle, while McEachern is delighted at the way affairs have turned. In the meantime Mr. Dolan’s friends wonder where that gentleman is. [149]

Al left Leadville on January 23, 1894, to accept a new position with a former employer. [150] This former employer was later revealed to be an unnamed Chicago-based mining syndicate and, by November of 1895, Al had become its president. He returned to Leadville to oversee the company’s purchase of the flourishing Forest Rose and Valley mines, which were boasting of $100,000 in unmined ore in December of that year. [151]

Al’s life would last for only a short time after leaving Leadville and he died at Colma, California on December 14, 1895, of unknown causes. [152] Lee and Belle eventually moved back to the Cincinnati area where Lee died [153] on December 12, 1918 [154] Belle followed him two decades later and was interred by his side there in 1946. [155]

Albert “Al” M. LEVY
Born: Bohemia, October, 1858
Died: Manhattan, New York City, February 24, 1935

Rose “Rosie” (Brann) Levy
Born: Germany, October, 1859
Died:

*Flora Levy
Born: New York City, October, 1887
Died:

*Josephine Levy
Born: New York City, December, 1892
Died:

Rosie and Al Levy had a total of six children born to them according to the 1900 U.S. Census. By 1900, only three of those children were enumerated as “living”. Of the three remaining children in 1900, twelve-year-old Flora, and seven-year-old Josephine, [156] would be the only surviving children who likely spent time in Leadville, though there is little documentation that confirms this. The absence of an 1890 U.S. Census due to its loss in a fire at the Commerce Department building at Washington D.C. in January of 1921 [157] makes it extremely difficult determine how many, if any, of the six Levy children ever came to Leadville. As an aside, Albert’s parents, Joseph and Sallie Levy, had a total of nine children who lived to adulthood. [158]

The following item appeared in the October 11, 1887, edition of the Leadville Daily Evening Herald, and is the first recording of Albert M. Levy in Leadville:

Albert M. Levy, an old-timer in this western country, representing Ohio & Co., manufacturers of Cuban cigars in New York City, was wrestling with the trade in that line here yesterday. [159]

It is unclear if Rosie and the couple’s children were ever full-time Leadville residents, although there are mentions of Rosie in Leadville records that suggest she did spend time in the Cloud City. An item appearing in the August 8, 1892, edition of the Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle noted that the family would be arriving in Leadville during the coming week and would be guests of Dr. David Heimberger, located at 130 West 4th Street, but did not indicate whether this was merely a visit, or if Rosie and the children would remain in the city. [160] A second news brief noted that Minna (Brann) Heimberger, [161] was Rosie’s sister. [162] Interestingly, although it does appear that between 1887 and 1892, Albert would be listed in both the New York City [163] and Denver [164] city directories, and likely had cigar enterprises connected to several distribution outlets in these locations, in addition to Leadville during this period. Albert Levy’s absence from Leadville city directories suggest that he was a part-time resident and likely lodged primarily with the Heimbergers when in town. Newspapers reveal that Albert and Rosie were present within the Leadville community between 1887 and 1896.

Rosie attended a meeting of the Jewish Ladies Reading Club at the Heimberger [165] home on August 28, 1892. [166] Albert was left without a half-month’s rent and lodging space when Mrs. Byrnes, proprietor of a boarding house she operated in the Callaway Block, which was owned by Goulder Janowitz, [167] had disappeared from Leadville in January of 1893 leaving her many creditors and tenants in the lurch. [168] Al was among the guests who attended the bon voyage party for Carrie Mayer [169] in advance of her return to Cincinnati on September 10, 1893. [170] Al and Rosie were present at the Hanukah feast on December 11, 1893. [171]

On February 27, 1896, Albert leased the Valley, Forest Rose and Rosebud lodes with the intent to mine the properties for three years. [172] This is the last mention of the Albert and Rose Levy family in Leadville. Records show that Albert Levy died of unknown causes in Manhattan on February 24, 1935 at the age of seventy-six. [173]

David Levy
Born: Austria, 1860
Died:

David Levy [174] was born in Austria and from there emigrated to Philadelphia. [175] The first mention of David Levy in Leadville was his attendance at the B’nai B’rith inaugural celebration dinner on November 9, 1879. [176] David does not appear in the Leadville city directory until 1880 which shows him working as a clerk for Joseph Shoenberg [177] and living as a boarder at the Grand Hotel [178] located at 129 and 131 Harrison Avenue where he roomed with Louis Jacobs, [179] who also worked for Shoenberg. [180]

During 1881, David served as a clerk for local Jewish clothier Louis Braham [181] and made his home at 410 Harrison Avenue. [182] David attended the Simchas Tora Ball, presented by the Ladies Hebrew Benevolent Society at City Hall on October 17. [183]

During 1883, David moved his home to 320 Harrison Avenue. [184] He attended the Hebrew Ladies Ball at Germania Hall on January 19. [185] He would move again to 113 East 4th Street in 1884. [186]

In 1885, David moved across the street to 112 West 4th Street [187] and began working as a clerk for Meyer Harris [188] at his clothing establishment. [189] Dave attended the Simchath Torah Ball presented by the Hebrew Ladies’ Aid Society on September 28, 1885, at City Hall. [190]

In 1886, David moved once more to 217 Harrison Ave. [191] There are no other records for David in Leadville, although he did spend some time at Denver in the years to follow. [192] David died in 1923 at Philadelphia of unknown causes and was a member of the Masonic Lodge. His wife, Rosa (b. 1858, d. 1935) is interred by his side at Adath Jeshurun Cemetery in that city. [193]

Jim Levy
Born: Dublin, Ireland, 1842
Died: Tucson, Arizona, June 5, 1882

Billed as the “Jewish Gunfighter”, Jim Levy is profiled in many secondary resources a legendary old west troublemaker with a short-lived career. As most of the resources on Jim Levy are of a secondary origin, many historians who have written on the subject to speculate on his Jewish ethnicity, [194] however, several Jewish historical publications claim him as one of their own, leaving little issue with his genetic provenance. Also curious is Levy’s time in Leadville, which was relatively uneventful. [195] Levy is an interesting study of Jewish migration in mining camps. Having come west initially to mine, he soon found his calling as a professional gambler and earned a reputation as a “natural” gunslinger. Not only does Levy demonstrate Jewish migration in boomtowns, spending time in Deadwood, Cheyenne, Leadville, Tombstone, and Tucson, but this places him in direct proximity to several other well-known Old West characters such as Doc Holliday, Bat Masterson, Wyatt Earp, William “Wild Bill” Hickock, Seth Bullock, and Sol Star, each of whom have voiced opinions on Levy’s prowess as a gunfighter from personal accounts.

Jim Levy was born the son of Hugh Levy and Anne Byrne on June 13, 1842. [196] Records show that Levy arrived from Liverpool, England, at New York in 1850 with his parents. In 1860, at the age of eighteen he is shown working with his brothers as a mason in Sacremento, California. [197] He spent most of the late 1860s and early 70s in Virginia City, Nevada, learning the life of a gambler in a mining community, heading for the Black Hills of South Dakota in the early 1870s. Jim Levy had become a well-known resident gambler of Cheyenne, Wyoming, by 1876. [198] He likely arrived in Leadville during the mid-summer of 1877 following his acquittal in Cheyenne on murder charges surrounding the death of Charlie Harrison during a gunfight in March after arriving there from Deadwood having escaped similar charges there. Most secondary resources place Levy in Leadville directly after his trial in Cheyenne in June of 1877 and moving on to Tombstone by 1880. [199] However, no primary documents have been found to confirm this. The following account of Levy’s showdown with Harrison on the streets of Cheyenne appeared in the July 7, 1907, edition of Leadville’s Herald Democrat newspaper which also indicates Levy’s probable connection to Leadville:

Thrity-five years ago Charley Harrison was one of the best known sporting men west of the Missouri river. His home was in St. Louis, but he traveled extensively through the Rocky mountain region. He was of an impetuous temperament, quick of action, of unquestioned courage and the most expert man I ever saw with a pistol. He could shoot faster and straighter when shooting at a target than any man I ever knew; then added to that the fact that no man possessed more courage than he did, the natural conclusion would be that he would be a most formidable foe to encounter in a pistol duel.

In 1876 he started for the Black hills which was then having a great mining boom on account of the discovery of gold at Deadwood. When Charley reached Cheyenne he became involved in a personal difficulty with another gambler by the name of Jim Levy, and both men started for their respective lodgings to get their pistols and have it out the first time they met. It looked like 100 to 1 that Harrison would win the fight because of his well known courage and proficiency in the use of the pistol. Little being known at that time about Jim Levy, Harrison was made a hot favorite in the betting in the various gambling resorts of Cheyenne. The men were not long in getting together after securing their revolvers, which they were of the Colt pattern and of 45 calibre in size.

They met on opposite sides of the principal street of the city, and opened fire on each other without a moment’s delay. Harrison, as was expected, fairly set his pistol on fire, he was shooting so fast, and managed to fire five shots at Levy before the latter could draw a bead on him. Levy finally let go a shot. It was all that was necessary. Harrison tumbled into the street in a dying condition, and was soon afterwards laid to rest alongside of others who had gone before in a similar way.

That Harrison was as game a man as Levy could not be doubted; that he could shoot much faster, he had given ample proof, but under extraordinary conditions he had shown that he lacked deliberation, and lost his life in consequence. The trouble with Charley Harrison was just this-he was too anxious. He wanted to shoot fast. Levy took his time. He looked through the sights on his pistol, which is a very essential thing to do when shooting at an adversary who is returning your fire. [200]

In their book, Pioneer Jews: A New Life in the Far West (1984) historians Harriet and Fred Rochlin note that Jim arrived in Pioche, Nevada, in 1871, with the intent to mine. On May 30, 1871, Levy witnessed Michael Casey shoot a man in the street. Casey claimed self-defense, but Levy was of differing opinion and expressed that publicly. Offended by this, Casey approached Levy about the matter and the two agreed to meet in an alley to settle the score. Levy acquired a weapon, met Casey who was subdued by shots to the head, neck, and a tap on the skull with Levy’s revolver. Casey died days later and Levy was tried and acquitted on murder charges as he established his new nefarious reputation. According to the Rochlins, Levy would survive sixteen shootouts before the seventeenth ended his campaign. [201]

Levy was killed in an altercation with John Murphy at Tucson on June 5, 1882, after an argument with faro dealer John Murphy. This was an incident in which Levy was unarmed and attacked by Murphy, along with a gang of his friends that included William Moyer, a man who would later be convicted of several murders in Arizona Territory. Although no primary accounting of Levy’s death has been found, Murphy and Moyer were convicted of manslaughter for the incident, had escaped from prison at Yuma, Arizona, and were sighted in the Tucson area by a local farmer on November 7, 1882. [202] Although it is unclear what became of Murphy, Moyer was recaptured at Denver in January of 1884, returned to Tucson where he was convicted of another killing, and finally restored to the territorial prison in Yuma where it is believed he served out his life sentence. [203]

Moses “Happy Mose” J. Levy
Born: Prussia, August 11, 1852
Died: Pittsburgh, 1942

Moses J. Levy, more commonly known as Happy Mose, arrived in Leadville from parts unknow in 1879 where he is listed in the city directory working as a clerk for Cheap Joe’s Clothing House, owned by local Jewish clothier Joe Shoenberg. He resided in the store located at 32 Chestnut Street. [204]

During 1880, Mose became a pawnbroker with a shop located at 210 Harrison Avenue while living at the rear of 204 West 4th Street. [205] The 1880 United States Census shows Mose living in a boarding house located at 212 Harrison Avenue, [206] which indicates that he likely moved his residence twice in 1880.

The following report appeared in the September 18, 1880, edition of the Leadville Weekly Democrat newspaper, and indicates that Mose had, on more than one occasion, been involved with less than legal activities during his Leadville residency:

On October 23, 1880, Mose appeared at a party given by Professor Henry Simon [207] at Turner Hall. [208] This is the last mention of Happy Mose in Leadville during this period. Mose did apply for a passport on June 5, 1882, at Pittsburgh. This record indicates that he was born in Prussia during August of 1852, and was naturalized in June of 1880, [209] which contradicts information collected for the 1880 census that indicated he was born in New York. [210] Mose appeared again in Leadville, as an upholsterer in 1897, living at 228 East 6th Street. [211] Moses J. Levy died at Pittsburgh of unknown causes in 1942. [212]

Drawing of Harrison Avenue storefronts as printed in The Herald Democrat, January 1, 1887.

Drawing of Harrison Avenue storefronts as printed in The Herald Democrat, January 1, 1887. One business shown is Cheap Joe’s Clothing House.

Denver Public Library Special Collections.

Skipped Out. Leadville, CO: Leadville Weekly Democrat. Saturday, September 18, 1880. Page 2.

Skipped Out. Leadville, CO: Leadville Weekly Democrat. Saturday, September 18, 1880. Page 2.

Lewis/Louis Levy
Born: London, June 4, 1836
Died: New York City, November 24, 1908

Rachel (Jacobs) Levy (Wife of Lewis)
Born: December, 1841
Died: Philadelphia, January 20, 1915

Alice Levy (Netter)
Born: Philadelphia, 1874
Died: Philadelphia, March 4, 1931

Sarah Levy
Born: Philadelphia, 1875
Died: Philadelphia, September 26, 1930

Abraham Levy
Born: Philadelphia, May 1876
Died: April 29, 1933

Marian Levy
Born: Leadville, June 21, 1881
Died: Philadelphia, October 27, 1960

Morris Levy
Born: New York, 1852
Died: September 4, 1914

Ella (Frank) Levy
Born: Kentucky, November 1, 1856
Died: Denver, October 22, 1910

Hester Levy
Born: Dallas, 1876
Died:

Rebecca Levy
Born: Dallas, 1877
Died:

Ralph Levy
Born: Missouri, 1855 (Shown in 1885 Census Enumerated in the Berne Frank household in Conejos, Colorado. He is listed as Berne’s nephew, and this is likely a familial comment. He is likely a cousin of Morris. [213]
Died:

Judah “Jude” J. Levy
Born: British Columbia, Canada, October, 1863
Died: Kings, New York, November 9, 1940

Gus Levy
Born:
Died:

The nature of the relationships for this Levy family is unclear and appears to contain both brothers and cousins, however, the only member featured in the 1880 United States Census is seventeen-year-old Judah (brother of Morris and Ralph?), his birthplace listed as British Columbia, and residing at 106 East Chestnut St. [214] The 1880 Leadville City Directory shows that Lewis and Morris (cousins?) were living at 219 West 4th Street, Lewis with the listed occupation of “auctioneer” and Morris listed simply as a clerk with no noted employer. [215] Judah may have been the first to arrive in Leadville as he is shown living separately from the rest of the family at 119 4th Street in the 1880 Leadville City Directory (in contrast to the census), which appears to have been a boarding house managed by Jenette Taylor, [216] and he worked as a clerk for the footwear firm of I.A. Kamak [217] & Co. [218] Subsequently, he is shown living with the rest of the family and his 1881 directory listing confirms this. [219] The family appears to have been popular within the Leadville community and on May 17, 1880, Jude attended a grand reception in honor of local Jewish clothier Joe Schoenberg. [220] Lewis is possibly the brother/cousin of Lesser Levy and they are shown often partnered together in business and living in the same home in 1890s Denver. [221]

During 1881, Ralph served as a clerk for J.H. Heron. Morris was shown in the vocation of musician, Jude, a clerk, and auctioneer Lewis is also present in their residence at 219 West 4th St. [222] On October 29, Rachel (Mrs. Lewis) celebrated her birthday with a large party, among those present were Gus, Ralph, and Sarah (daughter of Lewis?) Levy. [223] On October 30, Jude and Charles Loeb held a joint birthday party at 210 West 7th street, where Gus, Morris and Ralph were also in attendance. [224]

The family changed residences and moved across the lane to 210 West 4th Street during 1882. Ralph was a clerk for Heil & Hoelke, Jude, a clerk for M. Fornia, while Morris and Louis maintained their previous occupations. [225] Jude, and his unnamed lady companion, were present at the Pitkin Light Cavalry dance held at Turner Hall on March 28, 1882. [226] On October 19, a notice of forfeiture appeared in the Leadville Daily Herald noted that William and Leon Klopman [227] had expended one hundred dollars’ worth of work on the Aurella, Daisy, and Little Flair lodes, and their partners, that included Morris Levy, had ninety days to pay their appropriate share or relinquish their ownership. [228]

Throughout 1883, Judah was a driver for the Troy Laundry and resided at 133 E. Chestnut Street, [229] while Lewis moved his homestead to 206 W. 5th Street. [230] Morris was one of many who threw a grand testimonial celebration in honor of James H. Cragg at the Tabor Opera House on March 26, 1883. [231] Sarah Levy had a 90 average during the 1883 fall semester at the Seventh Street School (she appears to be in the 3rd grade, though this is unclear. She would be at least 8 years old in 1883). [232] Curiously, Morris, Lewis and Gus, all appear in the 1883 Denver city directory, and quite possibly split time between the two cities that year. [233]

During 1884 Ralph and Judah are the only members of the family shown in Leadville and both resided at 302 W. 5th Street. Jude is listed as a clerk and Ralph is shown as a jeweler. [234] On Valentine’s Day, Jude attended a dance party hosted by Anna McCleod at her parents’ home on East Fourth Street. [235] Jude’s listing in the city directory as a “clerk” however, there are many newspaper advertisements for his employer, City Hall Ice Cream Parlors operated by C. B. Jeffries, that note that Jude is his “…celebrated ice cream maker…”.

City Hall Ice Cream Parlors. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). Wednesday, May 28, 1884. Page 4.

City Hall Ice Cream Parlors. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). Wednesday, May 28, 1884. Page 4.

Jude was also present at the Thanksgiving ball given by the First Brigade Band at Armory Hall on November 27, 1884. [236] Curiously, there is no documentation for any members of this branch of the Levy family shown in Leadville during 1885.

Ralph was listed in the occupation of a barber living at 126 W. 4th Street in 1886. [237] Jude attended the Purim Bal Masque presented by the Ladies Hebrew Benevolent Association on March 24, 1886. [238] These are the last recordings of the family’s presence in Leadville. The last mention of this Levy family is an unclaimed letter for Alice at the post office on February 19, 1906. [239]

Lewis Levy continued his success as an auctioneer and died of a heart attack at New York City on November 23, 1908:

DEATH LAST BIDDER

New York, Nov. 24- “Going, going, gone.: Hardly had the last words left his mouth when Lewis Levy, a picturesque auctioneer of unredeemed pawned goods on Park Row dropped dead on his block yesterday. He had just accepted a bid of $63 for a split second watch and curiously enough, 63 was his own age. Levy was married and formerly a prosperous merchant. Physicians say that heart disease was the cause of his sudden death. [240]

Rachel would follow Lewis on January 20, 1915. Both are currently interred in a family plot at Adath Jeshurun Cemetery in that city. Marian Levy Bucks died of heart disease at Philadelphia on October 27, 1960. She is also interred at Adath Jeshurun Cemetery. [241] The couple had at least seven children who grew to adulthood, all of whom are buried alongside their parents with the exception of Maurice and Sarah. [242] Judah died of unknown causes on November 9, 1940, at Kings, New York and is interred at Mt. Hebron Cemetery in Flushing. [243]

Ralph never married and died at the age of twenty-six at Los Angeles from complications after he contracted a cold while already suffering from tuberculosis on January 27, 1890. [244] He is interred at Home of Peace Memorial Park in that city. [245] Ella Levy died at Denver on October 22, 1910, [246] Morris followed on September 4, 1914, [247] and both are interred at Denver’s Congregation Emanuel Cemetery.

It is likely that Lewis, Sam and Lesser Levy have an undetermined familial relationship as they are all shown in association at Denver and other cities during various points extending from the 1890’s [248] into the early 1900s. [249]

Lesser Levy
Born:
Died: Denver, March 3, 1919

Lesser Levy had an unclaimed letter at the Post Office on March 20, 1905. [250] Lesser Levy appears to be the “L” in L. Levy & Co.; a Denver based liquor enterprise [251] that Levy partnered in with brother-in-law [252] and former Leadville liquor merchant Albert Lewin. [253] It is likely that Leadville auctioneer Lewis Levy was also a member of this organization. [254] According to Lesser’s probate records, he was substantially invested in mining properties in Leadville, and Gilpin County, Colorado, as well as Los Angeles. [255] By 1905, the organization had become the Levy & Lewin Mercantile Company located at 1000 15th Street in Denver with Lesser as president and Lewin as the secretary and treasurer. [256]

Simon Levy
Born: Wurtenberg, Germany, July 16, 1847
Died: Queens, New York City, January, 1926

Little is known of Simon Levy or his origins. He first appears in Leadville, via the 1880 United States Census, residing at 102 W. Chestnut, a property owned by Leadville jeweler and pawnbroker Abson Goldsoll. At this time Goldsoll [257] boarded several of Leadville’s Jewish merchants [258] including Daniel Cohn and Barnabus Harris, [260] proprietors of Cohn & Harris, a clothing store located at 112 W. Chestnut Street where Simon was employed. [261]

Little information is available for Simon. The firm of Cohn & Harris closed during 1881 [262] and Simon is never listed in Leadville city directories. Simon resurfaces in New York City during 1884. [263] It is likely that he left Leadville and returned to Germany where he married Caroline Jacoby. [264] The couple had one child, David, in 1884. [265] Both Simon and Caroline passed at New York City during 1926, four months apart, of unknown causes. [266]

Sam Levy
Born: Califronia,1859
Died:

Sam Levy was associated with Henry Frankle [267] and Fred Butler [268] of the Palace of Fashion, both of whom travelled to Arkansas to meet and ride the rest of the way to Leadville with Sam on December 29, 1880. [269] It is likely that Sam was already a resident of Leadville at this point as he is listed in the 1880 United States Census and was recorded as a 21 year-old, single man in the occupation of “musician” and living at 202 W. 2nd Street. He is listed as the head of household, and living with thirty-seven year old laundress, Julia Buriland. [270] This location is also listed in the city directory as the storefront of Walter R. Shields, merchant tailor. [271] Samuel purchased one-eighth of the Jupiter and three-eighths of the Venus lodes for $1360 on April 8, 1880, [272] which demonstrates that he was interested in mining investments, and likely came to Leadville with some form of monetary grubstake.

On May 25, 1880, Samuel made several transactions, divesting himself of a great deal of mining property, selling off his interests in the Evening and Morning Star lodes to Joseph Kessler for $200.00, the Lady Douglas and Goldsmith Maid lodes to August Meyer for $2500.00, and the Bell of the Mountain, Texas Ranger, Yankee Doodle and the Mountain Lion mines to Joseph Kessler for $5000.00. [273]

Samuel Levy appears in two quit claim deeds where he received Lots 3 and 23 of the St, Louis Smelting and Refining Company’s addition to Leadville from Sol Kahn [274] for the consideration of one dollar on July 18, 1884. [275] This appears to be the last recording of Samuel Levy in Leadville.

Sam Levy is often shown in association with various Lesser Levy enterprises in Denver during the years to follow. The company appears to have been headquartered in New York City, and had branches in multiple western mining camps. The following appeared in the December 30, 1916 edition of the Leadville Herald Democrat newspaper:

Levy Brothers Held For Misuse Of The Mails. (Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat). Saturday, December 30, 1916. Page 3.

Levy Brothers Held For Misuse Of The Mails. (Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat). Saturday, December 30, 1916. Page 3.

It appears the final location closed their doors at Bisbee, Arizona in 1916, the same year that former Leadville clothier Jake Sands [276] died there. [277]

Sol Levy
Born:
Died:

Regina Levy
Born:
Died:

Records for this Sol Levy are scarce and reveal his time in Leadville was brief. Sol first appears in Leadville at the Knights of Labor ball on November 12, 1891. [278] He does not appear in city directories from this period.

Sol Levy is one of 300 Leadvillians who were afforded a special rate by the Colorado Midland rail line to travel to Denver for the annual meeting of the Colorado Mining Congress on the evening of November 17, 1891. [279] The following day Sol Levy went to Denver to retrieve his wife, Regina, and bring her back to Leadville. [280] Sol attended a sleighride and dinner party at the home of Amelia Leppel [281] on December 5, 1893, [282] and this is his last mention in Leadville records.

William Levy
Born: Austria, January 4, 1850
Died: Philadelphia, April 27, 1923

William Levy arrived in Leadville on April 14,1882. The Leadville Daily Herald noted he would be sending for his wife and family after he established a new business and was settled in. [283] Based on these clues, and the abundance of William Levy’s in the United States during the 1880’s, this is likely the same William Levy family listed in the 1880 U.S. Census living in Haverstraw, New York. There is no evidence that William’s family, wife Jennie and their two children, Joseph (b. 1878) and Dora (b. 1880), [284] ever made the journey to Leadville. William appears in the 1882 Leadville city directory with no job listing, living at 303 Harrison Ave, which served primarily as an administrative center for many mining companies and appears to have had residential rooms to let. [285] There are no records for William Levy in Leadville after 1882, and it is unlikely that his family ever left New York. William died of unknown causes at Philadelphia in 1923 [286] and is interred at Mount Sinai Cemetery in that city. [287]

Charles Levy
Born: Germany, October, 1849
Died:

Charles Levy’s time in Leadville may have been less than successful and wrought with mishaps. His first appearance in Leadville records is in July of 1879, when he appears as the victim of an unfortunate mining accident in the Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle:

A Terrible Fall. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle). Friday, July 18, 1879. Page 4.

A Terrible Fall. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle). Friday, July 18, 1879. Page 4.

There is little record of Charles Levy in Leadville, often escaping listings in the city directories and enumeration in censuses. There are no listings for Charles in the 1879, 1880, or 1881 Leadville city directories, although another newspaper article suggests Charles may have been a transient gambler who found himself in some difficult legal trouble that was reported in the August 27, 1881, edition of the Leadville Weekly Democrat:

Caught Napping

Charles Levy, Who Played a New Confidence Game Some Time Ago Captured At Last.

It will be remembered that some days ago a young man by the name of Charles Levy, victimized two gentlemen with whom he was acquainted, and he was frightened into his lair by the expose that followed. The details of the affair were recounted at that time, and in connection with the last phase of the case it is probably necessary to repeat them. Levy is a gambler that is generally classified with the “tin horns.” There is but little danger of his compelling the dealer to turn up his box, and his efforts are short and sweet. A few days ago Levy went to Mr. Robert Miller, as an attache at Billy Nye’s saloon, and while they were talking, Levy suddenly inquired the time of day. Mr. Miller informed him that his watch was disabled when Levy volunteered to take it and have it repaired. Miller consented, and Levy took the watch. He proceeded at once to Davies’ pawn shop, on Harrison avenue near Second street, where he obtained a loan on it. The funds in all probability went over the faro table, and the next thing that he got hold of was a diamond stud, valued at three hundred dollars, and which was the property of Mr. Blake, of the Clipper rooms.

This went in the same way, and the two victims began to make an investigation. In the meantime Levy had secreted himself, and was nowhere to be found. The matter was placed in the hands of Captain Byrne, and he proceeded upon a vigorous search for the culprit. Several days were employed in strategy, and finally it was learned that Levy’s lair was in a room above a butcher shop on Spruce street, between Second and Third streets [likely the grocery store of Koebrich & Dyke listed at 2nd street and Spruce in the 1881 city directory ]. Captain Byrne went to the room door, and walking in, found Levy and two others seated around a table, with a dejected demijon beside them and a well abused box of cigars. It was a cruel and unkind interruption, but the captain was compelled to make the intrusion.

“That’s the man,” said Davies, the pawnbroker who had been taken along for the purpose of identifying the fellow.

Levy had attempted to shut out his identity by impersonating the beardless boy, and the incipient bunch of hair that had adorned his upper lip, had been removed. Even in this wonderful disguise, however, his features were visible, and the officer beckoning to him, ordered him to march. Levy obeyed, and was satisfied to the county jail, where in his solitude, he will have plenty of time to lament the error of his ways. He has been hiding in this room for some time, and was living in regal ease when he was surprised. His case will come up today. [290]

During 1882, Charles appears in the city directory with no job listing while living at 115 West 3rd Street. [291] Charley managed to escape with his trunk from Mrs. De Hall’s boarding house, located above Julius Londoner’s [292] grocery and J.H. Hornsyder’s [293] drug store at 401, 403, and 405 Harrison Avenue, [294] during a massive conflagration that caused significant damage to a great many structures along this block at 4th street and Harrison on November 30, 1883. [295] This is the last recording of Charles Levy in Leadville. Though Charles had no vocation listed during his time in Leadville, he appears to have moved on to Breckenridge, Colorado where he became a successful clothier. [296]

P.J Levy
Born: Ohio, 1847
Died:

Ora A. Levy
Born: Ohio, 1858
Died:

Phillip L. Levy
Born: Ohio, 1883
Died:

Alfonso S Levy
Born: Ohio, 1883
Died:

Mary H. Levy
Born: Leadville, 1885
Died:

The P.J. Levy family arrived in Leadville, likely in 1885, from Ohio, and did not remain long. Although they were enumerated in the 1885 Special Colorado State Census there is no address identified, [297] and the family escaped recording in Leadville city directories or local newspapers. The family resurfaces in Cincinnati, Ohio, with P.J. partnered in Levy, Price & Co., a manufacturer of boy’s clothing. [298]

Victor Levy
Born: Warsaw, Poland/Russia, November, 1870
Died:

Victor Levy came to the United States via New York City from Poland in 1888. [299] He married Rebecca Kaplan, also a Russian immigrant, on January 28, 1893. [300] There is no indication that Rebecca and the couple’s two children were ever present in Leadville. [301] Victor’s time in Leadville was brief; he is only documented a few times in Leadville records. Victor is listed as a cashier, working at the Blakey-Smale Dry Goods store at 142 East 6th Street, where he likely resided. [302] On June 11, 1901, Victor served as Claude Wilson’s best man when he married Anna Holmes. [303] Victor was a member of the Elks Club and was nominated for the office of secretary on April 4, 1902. [304] Victor likely returned to New York City and his family sometime in 1902.

Leadville Levys with Limited Documentation

There were other people with the Levy surname that have limited documentation in Leadville records. As these people should be counted in any thorough examination of Jewish pioneer history in Leadville, they are noted as follows:

Marshall Levy
Born:
Died:

Marshall Levy has an unclaimed letter at the Leadville post office on May 21, 1879. [305]

E.J. Levy
Born:
Died:

E. J. Levy had unclaimed mail at the Leadville post office on June 4, 1879. [306]

J.T. Levy
Born: Missouri, 1838
Died:

The story of J.T. Levy is limited. He appears in Leadville enumerated in the 1880 United States Census as an attorney living alone at an illegible address [307] that cannot be cross referenced with the Leadville city directory.

Marle Levy (Lewrin)
Born:
Died:

According to the Leadville Daily Herald Albert Lewin received legal permission to marry Miss Marle Levy on October 21, 1883. [308] Marle Levy is the sister of Leadville auctioneer Lewis Levy, but there is no evidence of her ever residing the Levy home.

Sigmund Levy
Born:
Died:

The only mention of Sigmund Levy is found in the 1880 Leadville city directory where he is listed as clerk for attorney W.J. Waldheimer, located at 219 Harrison Avenue, and likely resided at his office. [309] There are no definitive records for Sigmund that can be found that tell us about his life before or after his time in Leadville.

Jacob “Jake” Levy
Born:
Died:

Jake Levy attended the Simchath Torah Ball presented by the Hebrew Ladies’ Aid Society on September 28, 1885, at City Hall. [310] There were two unclaimed telegrams for Jacob Levy at the Leadville telegram office on March 26, 1879. [311]

Elsie Levy
Born:
Died:

On September 18, 1905, [312] Elsie Levy was Maid of Honor, and her father, Rabbi M. Levy of Chicago, presided over the wedding of Rose Heimberger and Garson Kahn at Temple Israel. [313] According to newspaper reports, this was the most elaborate Jewish weddings to ever take place in Leadville. [314] Newspaper articles are vague, noting only that Elsie originated from Chicago [315] and would soon be “…leaving for the east”. [316] Since there are no Levys listed in Leadville city directories during this period, it is possible that she briefly lived in Leadville with the Kahn family though this is unclear.

Joseph Levy
Born:
Died:

Joseph Levy attended the Central School in the autumn of 1891. [317] He performed a “bone solo” with Benny Cohn [318] on piano at a meeting of the Meletarian Society [319] on November 13, 1891.

1 The National Archives at Washington, D.C.; Washington, D.C.; Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New Orleans, Louisiana, 1820-1902; (NAI Number: 2824927; Record Group Title: Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service; Record Group Number: 85).
2 Ancestry.com. Louisiana, Compiled Marriage Index, 1718-1925, 1946-1961 [database on-line]. (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc). 2004.
3 Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 12 September 2020), memorial page for Lily Rose Levy Schnitzer (21 Mar 1878–30 May 1968), Find a Grave Memorial no. 172222629, citing Beth Israel Cemetery, Houston, Harris County, Texas, USA ; Maintained by Patrick Lee (contributor 48447064) .
4 Glenn R. Scott, F. Craig Burnstein, Carol Quesenberry, and Gayle M. Dumonceaux. Historic Trail Map of the Leadville 1 X 2 Quadrangle, Central Colorado. (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey. Central Publishing Group). 2004.
5 [Official] List Of Letters. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle. May 28, 1879. P2.
6 TB Corbett, WC Hoye and JH Ballenger. Corbet, Hoye and Co’s First Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City Of Leadville for 1880. (Leadville, CO: Democrat Printing Company. 1880). P229.
7 License. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). January 1, 1881. P4.
8 Lake County, US Census Index For 1860,1870 And 1880. (Historical Research Cooperative. Leadville, CO; USA). 1985.
9 TB Corbett and JH Ballenger. Corbet, and Ballenger’s Second Annual City Directory: Containing A Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City Of Leadville for 1881. (Leadville, CO: Corbet and Ballenger Publishers.1881). P189.
10 A Grand Reception. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). May 23, 1880. P4.
11 For more information on Joe Schoenberg and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/shoenberg.html
12 The Reorganized Stock Board. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Democrat). April 8, 1880. P6.
13 For more information on Moses Cooper, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/cooper.html
14 For more information on David Loeb and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/loeb.html
15 For more information on Herman Hauser and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/hauser.html
16 Crooked Cooper. (Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle). September 11, 1880. P8.
17 Birthday Party. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). December 17, 1880. P4.
18 Corbett and Ballenger. Denver, CO; USA. 1880. P429.
19 For more information on Rosa Schloss and her family, please visit: http://www.jewishleadville.org/schloss.html
20 For more information on Rosa and Morris Altman and their family, please visit: http://www.jewishleadville.org/altman.html
21 Altman-Schloss. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Democrat). January 30, 1881. P8.
22 Notice. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Democrat). May 7, 1881. P2.
23 The Mines. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). March 23, 1881. P4.
24 For more information on Horace Tabor, please visit: https://www.coloradovirtuallibrary.org/digital-colorado/coloradohistories/boom-years/horace-tabor-the-silver-king/
25 For more information on Colorado businessman Charles Boettcher, please see: https://www.coloradovirtuallibrary.org/digitalcolorado/colorado-histories/boom-years/charles-boettcher-denver-businessman/
26 For more information on Joseph H. Monheimer and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/monheimer.html
27 The Leadville Stock Exchange. (Leadville Democrat. April 13, 1881). P6.
28 The Atlantic and Pacific. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Weekly Democrat). April 30, 1881. P6.
29 Colorado Consolidated. Leadville, CO: Leadville Weekly Democrat. December 31, 1881. P6.
30 For more information on Adolph Baer and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/baer.html
31 District Court. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. February 1, 1882). P4.
32 For more information on the locations of the following Jewish owned businesses and more, please consult our interactive map at: https://www.google.com/maps/d/u/0/viewer?mid=1CZ7NjS8NdaSjjuDdHuWu-gpoFbj6WXbz&ll=39.25986650006411%2C-106.29959952783204&z=14
33 For more information on Simon Goldstein and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/goldstein.html
34 For more information on Hiram Brodie and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/brodie.html
35 For more information on Joseph and Marcus Monheimer, and their family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/monheimer.html
36 For more information on Dan Golding and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/golding.html
37 A Big Gift Scheme. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). February 3, 1882. P4.
38 Mining Notes. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). May 10, 1882. P4.
39 Pointed Paragraphs. (Leadville, CO. Leadville Daily Herald). June 6, 1882. P4.
40 County Court. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). June 15, 1882. P1.
41 Paul Pry. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). July 15, 1882. P4.
42 A Reception. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). August 30, 1882. P4.
43 For more information on Lewis and Rosa Lyon please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/lyon.html
44 Lewis Lyon’s Reception. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. October 31, 1882. P4.
45 The newspaper diagnosis of “crysipeins” is difficult to find in periodic references. The name sometimes appears in medical journals from the era, and generally in congress with other medical conditions such as neuralgia, pneumonia and bronchitis, but neither a periodic or modern term can be found to identify it with any specificity other than it was an “iruptivo” or “eruptive” disease meaning it caused large skin rashes, and was extremely painful. It does not appear to be in and of itself fatal, which suggests that there was likely an unknown comorbidity that contributed to, or directly caused the death of Sol Levy. Please see: Archibald Hall M.D, L.R.S.E. The British American Journal of Medical And Physical Science Vol. V. (Montreal, Quebec; C.A. John C. Becket). 1850. P297.
46 At Rest. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). October 26, 1882. P1.
47 The Round Up. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). October 27, 1882. P4.
48 Search. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). December 18, 1882. P4.
49 Final Notice. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). December 31, 1882. P2.
50 For more about Fanny Cohn and her family, please visit: http://www.jewishleadville.org/cohn.html
51 Business Notice. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). January 12, 1883. P4.
52 Bay City Tunnel. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). January 11, 1883. P3.
53 District Court. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). January 30, 1883. P4.
54 County Court. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). October 10, 1882. P4.
55 For more information on Sol Rice and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/rice.html
56 Rich Remembrances. (Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle). October 6, 1883. P5.
57 List Of Letters. (Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle). October 20, 1883. P7.
58 An Old Case Settled. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle. June 2, 1893). P1.
59 TB Corbett and JH Ballenger. Corbet, and Ballenger’s Sixth Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List Of The Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City Of Leadville For 1885. (Leadville, CO: Corbet and Ballenger Publishers.1885). P160.
60 Personal Points. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). January 13, 1884. P4.
61 For more information on Anna Harris Herman and her family please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/herman.html
62 Sheriff’s Sale. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). March 31, 1885. P3.
63 A Happy Occasion. (Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle). June 21, 1884. P12.
64 The Sixth Annual Ball. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). October 9, 1884. P4.
65 C. C. C. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. March 16, 1884. P4.
66 The Talented Ten. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). April 13, 1884. P4.
67 For more information on the Eliel family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/eliel.html
68 Taffy Pull. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). June 15, 1884. P4.
69 Congregation Israel. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). September 20, 1884. P4.
70 Sabbath of repentance.
71 Habeth Tshuva. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). October 4, 1884. P4.
72 Personal Points. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). October 4, 1884. P4.
73 City Brieflets. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). November 13, 1883. P4.
74 TB Corbett and JH Ballenger. Corbet, and Ballenger’s Sixth Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List Of The Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City Of Leadville For 1885. (Leadville, CO: Corbet and Ballenger Publishers.1885). P160.
75 Jagged Justice. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. April 15, 1884). P4.
76 A Light Day In District Court. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle). February 2, 1893. P4.
77 The Talk Of Society. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). March 14, 1885. P4.
78 The Hebrew Hop. (Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle). September 26, 1885. P4.
79 Public Charities. (Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle). January 3, 1885. P2.
80 Sheriff’s Sale. (Leadville, CO: Leadville, Daily Herald). March 24, 1885. P3.
81 Children’s Ball. (Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle). May 9, 1885. P3.
82 The Parish School. (Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle). July 4, 1885. P8.
83 TB Corbett and JH Ballenger. Corbet, and Ballenger’s Seventh Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List Of The Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City Of Leadville For 1886. (Leadville, CO: Corbet and Ballenger Publishers). 1886. P33.
84 Social and Personal. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle). July 25, 1887. P2.
85 Filed For Record. (Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat). November 11, 1899. P7.
86 For more information on Joe Miller and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/miller.html
87 For more information on Isaac Kahn and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/kahn.html
88 For more information on Adolph Baer and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/baer.html
89 For more information on Maurice Mayer and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/mayer.html
90 For more information on Julius Witkowski and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/witkowski.html
91 For more information on Golder Janowitz and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/janowitz.html
92 For more information on Isidore Grossmayer and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/grossmayer.html
93 For more information on Henry Ludwig and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/ludwig.html
94 For more information on Maurice Leppel and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/leppel.html
95 For more information on Moses Londoner and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/londoner.html
96 For more information on Jacob Schloss and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/schloss.html
97 For more information on Charlotte Schloss Stern and her family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/stern.html
98 For more information on Jennie Kahn Sandusky and her family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/sandusky.html
99 For more information on Henry Angerman and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/angerman.html
100 For more information on David May and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/may.html
101 For More information on Joseph H. Monheimer and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/monheimer.html
102 For more information on Jake Sands/Sandelowsky and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/sands-sandelowsky.html
103 For more information on Adolph Schayer and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/schayer.html
104 For more information on Herman Strauss and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/strauss.html
105 For more information on Ben Davies and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/davies.html
106 For more information on Sam Berry and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/berry.html
107 Parks Bond Matter. (Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat. August 4, 1891). P5.
108 For more information on Bertha Berry and her family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/berry.html
109 In The Giddy Whirl. (Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat. October 11, 1891). P5.
110 Mining Industry. (Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle). April 28, 1893. P8.
111 An Old Case Settled. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle). June 2, 1893. P6.
112 An Old Decision Revived. (Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat). June 29, 1893. P1.
113 Work On Those Old Cases. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle). March 5, 1896. P4.
114 List Of Delinquent Taxes. (Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat). October 12, 1903. P12
115 Find a Grave. Memorial Page for Babette Halff Levy (10 May 1844–12 Feb 1926), Find a Grave Memorial no. 193602344. (East Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, USA: Home of Peace Memorial Park, East Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, USA). 2020.
116 Find a Grave, Database and Images. Memorial Page for Solomon Levy (1836–26 Oct 1882), Find a Grave Memorial no. 193602370., East Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, USA: Home of Peace Memorial Park; Maintained by Scott G (contributor 453).
117 The Book of Memorials. (Cincinatti, OH: The American Israelite). September 26, 1930. P5.
118 United States Census, 1880. Emma Levy in household of H Levy, Leadville, Lake, Colorado, United States; citing enumeration district ED 73, sheet 313A, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), FHL microfilm 1,254,091. 2017.
119 Corbett and Ballenger. Leadville, CO; USA. 1881. P429.
120 Lewis Lyon’s Reception. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). October 31, 1882. P4.
121 For more information on David, Rosa May and their family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/may.html
122 The Social World. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). December 2, 1883. P6.
123 The Law’s Holiday. (Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle). October 11, 1884. P6.
124 Gentleman’s List. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle). July 31, 1879. P3.
125 Colorado State Census, 1885. Al Levy in entry for Joe Sonnebery, 1885; citing NARA microfilm publication M158 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration.); FHL microfilm 498,507. 2016.
126 Corbett and Ballenger. Leadville, CO. 1885. P224.
127 Corbett and Ballenger. Leadville, CO; USA. 1881. P189.
128 TB Corbett and JH Ballenger. Corbet, and Ballenger’s Sixth Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List Of The Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City Of Leadville For 1885. (Leadville, CO: Corbet and Ballenger Publishers.1885). P224.
129 The National Archives at Washington, D.C.; Washington, D.C.; Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New Orleans, Louisiana, 1820-1902; (NAI Number: 2824927; Record Group Title: Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service; Record Group Number: 85).
130 Chow Chow. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). June 23, 1882. P4.
131 Corbett and Ballenger. Leadville, CO; USA. 1883. P176.
132 The Wheels Of Commerce. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). August 6, 1884. P1.
133 Nancy Manly and Sherrile Worford. Index For 1885 Special Census Lake County, Colorado. (Leadville, CO: Historic Research Cooperative). 1984. P330.
134 Corbett and Ballenger. Denver, CO. 1885. P411.
135 A Sporty Boy. (Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat. November 28, 1891). P4.
136 JH Ballenger and Richards. Ballenger & Richard’s Thirteenth Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Leadville for 1892. (Leadville, CO: Ballenger and Richards Publishers.1892). P169.
137 TB Corbett and JH Ballenger. Corbet, and Ballenger’s Sixth Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List Of The Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City Of Leadville For 1885. (Leadville, CO: Corbet and Ballenger Publishers.1885). P160.
138 The Purim Bal Masque. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle). March 25 1886. P3.
139 TB Corbett and JH Ballenger. Corbet, and Ballenger’s Seventh Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List Of The Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City Of Leadville For 1886. (Leadville, CO: Corbet and Ballenger Publishers). 1886. P167.
140 For more information on Richard and Rachel Metz and their family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/metz.html
141 A Wedding Anniversary. (Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat). April 14, 1886. P4.
142 Slight Accident on the South Park. (Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat). July 13, 1886. P3.
143 Lena Rupenthal’s Ruin. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle). May 9, 1889. P1.
144 Herald Democrat. November 28, 1891. P4.
145 The Lenten Season. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle). March 21, 1892. P3.
146 Simchas Torah. (Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat). October 19, 1892. P4.
147 JH Ballenger and Richards. Ballenger & Richard’s Thirteenth Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Leadville for 1892. (Leadville, CO: Ballenger and Richards Publishers.1892). P169.
148 District Court. (Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat). August 23, 1892. P5.
149 John Breathes The Air. (Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat). November 21, 1893. P2.
150 Personal Mention. (Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat). January 24, 1894. P5.
151 Topics From The Mines. (Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat). December 11, 1895. P6
152 Find a Grave. Memorial Page for Alfred P Levy (1848–14 Dec 1895). Find a Grave Memorial no. 6616727, Colma, San Mateo County, California, USA: Hills of Eternity Memorial Park; Maintained by Diane Reich (contributor 40197331). 2020.
153 Ohio Department of Health. Ohio, Death Records, 1908-1932, 1938-2018 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010.
154 Find a Grave. Memorial Page for Lee Levy (1859–1918). Find a Grave Memorial no. 180316313, Price Hill, Hamilton County, Ohio, USA: Price Hill United Jewish Cemetery. Maintained by Cindy S (contributor 18484625) . 2020.
155 Find a Grave. Memorial page for Bella Levy (1865–6 Jun 1946). Find a Grave Memorial no. 180315979. Price Hill, Hamilton County, Ohio, USA: Price Hill United Jewish Cemetery ; Maintained by Cindy S (contributor 18484625) .
156 United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls.
157 Jason Gauthier. Availability of 1890 Census - History - U.S. Census Bureau. (Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Commerce). 1996.
158 Tenth Census of the United States, 1880. (NARA microfilm publication T9, 1,454 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C.
159 Personal. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle). October 11, 1887. P3.
160 Visiting The Valley. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle). August 8, 1892. P2.
161 For more information on Minna Heimberger and her family please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/heimberger.html
162 Begins To Look Bright. 9Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat). August 14, 1892. P4.
163 Ancestry.com. Elmira, New York Directories, 1889-1893 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000.
164 Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.
165 For more information on Dr. David Heimberger and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/heimberger.html
166 These Are Gay Times. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle). August 29, 1892. P2.
167 For more information on Goulder Janowitz and his family, please visit: http://www.jewishleadville.org/janowitz.html
168 Forgot To A Leave Card. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle). January 31, 1893. P4.
169 For more information on Carrie Kahn Mayer and her family please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/mayer.html
170 Pleasant Autumn Days. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle). September 11, 1893. P2.
171 The Feast Of Chanuka. (Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat). December 12, 1893. P8.
172 Mining Lease. Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat. February 28, 1896. P5.
173 Index to New York City Deaths 1862-1948. Indices prepared by the Italian Genealogical Group and the German Genealogy Group, and used with permission of the New York City Department of Records/Municipal Archives. 2020.
174 Records for David Levy include minor misspellings of his first and last names, birthdates that very two to three years, and cite birthplaces of Philadelphia and Austria. These miscues are few, and not uncommon for the era when records were poorly kept, frequently written by hand and dictated to the scribe. Most of these inconsistencies are rectified through what appears in records most frequently, and documents such as David’s 1888 U.S. Passport application, which was written by his own hand and more likely to have been scrutinized by government officials.
175 United States Passport Applications, 1795-1925. (M1372) Passport Applications. (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.)
176 B’nai B’rith. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Weekly Herald). November 15, 1879. P3.
177 For more information on Joe Shoenberg and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/shoenberg.html
178 Corbett and Ballenger. Denver, CO; USA. 1880. P229.
179 United States Census, 1880. David Levi in household of Lewis Jacobs, Leadville, Lake, Colorado, United States; citing enumeration district ED 75, sheet 349D, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), FHL microfilm 1,254,091.
180 Corbett and Ballenger. Denver, CO; USA. 1880. P407.
181 For more information on Louis Braham and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/braham.html
182 TB Corbett and JH Ballenger. Corbet, and Ballenger’s Second Annual City Directory: Containing A Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City Of Leadville for 1881. (Leadville, CO: Corbet and Ballenger Publishers.1881). P189.
183 Simchas Taura Ball. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). October 23, 1881. P3.
184 TB Corbett and JH Ballenger. Corbet, and Ballenger’s Fourth Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms Etc. in The City Of Leadville for 1883. (Denver, CO: Corbet and Ballenger Publishers.1883). P176.
185 Hebrew Ladies Ball. (Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle). January 20, 1883. P4.
186 TB Corbett and JH Ballenger. Corbet, and Ballenger’s Fifth Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List Of The Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City Of Leadville For 1884. (Leadville, CO: Corbet and Ballenger Publishers. 1884). P161.
187 Colorado State Census, 1885. Dave Levy in entry for S M Graves. 1885; citing NARA microfilm publication M158 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 498,507. 1885.
188 For more information on Meyers Harris and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/harris.html
189 Corbett and Ballenger. Leadville, CO. 1885. P160.
190 Hebrew Hop. (Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle). September 26, 1885. P4.
191 TB Corbett and JH Ballenger. Corbet, and Ballenger’s Seventh Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List Of The Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City Of Leadville For 1886. (Leadville, CO: Corbet and Ballenger Publishers). 1886. P167.
192 Corbett and Ballenger. Denver, CO. 1891 City Directory. Provo, UT. 2011. P866.
193 Find a Grave. Memorial Page for David G Levy (1850–1923). Find a Grave Memorial no. 151290573. Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, USA: Adath Jeshurun Cemetery; Maintained by Crypt Tonight (contributor 48494116).
194 Rhiannon Deremo, Jim Leavy, Gunfighter. (Cave Creek, AZ: True West Magazine). January 16, 2017.
195 Robert K. DeArment, Deadly Dozen: Forgotten Gunfighters of the Old West. (Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press). 2010.
196 Ancestry.com. Ireland, Select Catholic Birth and Baptism Registers, 1763-1917 [database on-line]. (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.). 2014.
197 1860 U.S. census. Population Schedule. NARA Microfilm Publication M653, 1,438 rolls. (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration). 1860.
198 DeArment, University of Oklahoma Press, 2010.
199 DeArment, University of Oklahoma Press, 2010.
200 Nerve Required To Face A Gun. Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat. July 7, 1907. P7.
201 Harriet Rochlin and Fred Rochlin. Pioneer Jews: A New Life In The Far West. (Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin). 1984. Pp171-72.
202 The Tucson Jaibreakers. (Tucson, Arizona: Arizona Weekly Citizen). November 26, 1882. P1.
203 An Upright Judge. (Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle). January 12, 1884. P7.
204 WM Clark, WA Root And HC Anderson. Clark, Root and Co’s First Annual City Directory of Leadville and Business Directory of Carbonateville, Kokomo and Malta for 1879. (Denver, CO: Daily Times Steam Printing House And Book Manufactory.1879). P96.
205 Corbett and Ballenger. Denver, CO; USA. 1880. P229.
206 United States Census, 1880. Mose J Levi in household of Nathan A Thorn. (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), FHL microfilm 1,254,091.
207 For more information on Professor Henry Simon and his family, please visit: http://www.jewishleadville.org/simon.html
208 Professor Simon’s Party. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. October 4, 1880. P4.
209 United States Passport Applications, 1795-1925. Database With Images, FamilySearch. (M1372) Passport Applications, 1795-1905 > Roll 250, vol 552-553, 1882 Jun > image 367 of 1515; citing NARA microfilm publications M1490 and M1372 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration). 2018.
210 United States Census, 1880. Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress.
211 JH Ballenger and Richards. Ballenger & Richard’s Eighteenth Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Leadville for 1897. (Leadville, CO: Ballenger and Richards Publishers. 1897). P183.
212 Find a Grave. Memorial Page for Moses Levy (1852–1942), Find a Grave Memorial no. 159996190. (Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, USA: West View Cemetery). Maintained by Mel Truman (contributor 48799799) .2020.
213 Ancestry.com. Colorado State Census, 1885 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 2006.
214 Nancy Manly and Sherrill Worford. Lake County, US Census Index For 1860, 1870 And 1880. (Leadville, CO; USA: Historical Research Cooperative). 1985. P456.
215 Corbett, Hoye and Ballenger. Leadville, CO. 1880. P229.
216 Corbett, Hoye and Ballenger. Leadville, CO. 1880. P281.
217 For more information on Isaac Kamak and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/kamak.html
218 Corbett, Hoye and Ballenger. Leadville, CO. 1880. P397.
219 Corbett and Ballenger. Leadville, CO; USA. 1881. P189.
220 A Grand Reception. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). May 23, 1880. P4.
221 Corbett, TB and Ballenger, JH. Corbett and Ballengers’s Eighteenth Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Denver for 1890. (Provo, UT: Brigham Young University Internet Archive. 2011). P733.
222 Corbett and Ballenger. Leadville, CO; USA. 1881. P189.
223 Birthday Parties. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). October 30, 1881. P3.
224 Breakfast Table Talk. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). October 30, 1881. P3.
225 Corbett and Ballenger. Leadville, CO; USA. 1882. P185.
226 Pitkin’s Proud Paraders. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. April 2, 1882. P4.
227 For more information on William and Leon Klopman, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/klopman.html
228 Notice Of Forfeiture. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). October 19, 1882. P4.
229 Corbett and Ballenger. Leadville, CO; USA.1883. P176.
230 Corbett and Ballenger. Leadville, CO; USA.1883. P176.
231 Easter. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). March 23, 1883. P4.
232 Seventh Street School. (Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle). December 8, 1883. P4.
233 Corbet and Ballenger. Denver, CO.1883. P413.
234 Corbet, TB and Ballenger, JH. Corbet & Ballenger’s Twelfth Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Denver for 1884. (Provo, UT: Brigham Young University Internet Archive. 2011). P421.
235 A Surprise Party. (Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle). February 16, 1884. P4.
236 At Armory Hall. (Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle). December 6, 1884. P1.
237 TB Corbett and JH Ballenger. Corbet, and Ballenger’s Seventh Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List Of The Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City Of Leadville For 1886. (Leadville, CO: Corbet and Ballenger Publishers). 1886. P167.
238 The Purim Bal Masque. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle). March 25 1886. P3.
239 Advertised Letters. (Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat). February 19, 1906. P8.
240 Death Last Bidder. Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat. November 25, 1908. P1.
241 Pennsylvania Historic and Museum Commission. Death certificates, 1906–1967. Certificate Number Range: 095101-097800. (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania). 2020.
242 Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 12 November 2020), memorial page for Lewis Levy (4 Jun 1836–5 Nov 1914), Find a Grave Memorial no. 37861836, citing Adath Jeshurun Cemetery, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, USA ; Maintained by Miek Good (contributor 47114871) .
243 Ancestry.com. New York, New York, Extracted Death Index, 1862-1948 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.
244 California, County Birth and Death Records, 1800-1994. [Database with Images], Family Search. (Los Angeles > Deaths 1890 > image 57 of 727; California State Archives, Sacramento). 2018.
245 Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 25 October 2020), memorial page for Ralph Levy (1864–27 Jan 1890), Find a Grave Memorial no. 156575929, citing Home of Peace Memorial Park, East Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, USA ; Maintained by Steve and Linda Malkson (contributor 48608432) .
246 Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 25 October 2020), memorial page for Bella Levy (1 Nov 1856–22 Oct 1910), Find a Grave Memorial no. 9913332, citing Congregation Emanuel Cemetery, Denver, Denver County, Colorado, USA ; Maintained by Digginrellies (contributor 46522347) .
247 Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 25 October 2020), memorial page for Morris A. Levy (24 Jun 1852–4 Sep 1914), Find a Grave Memorial no. 9913323, citing Congregation Emanuel Cemetery, Denver, Denver County, Colorado, USA ; Maintained by Digginrellies (contributor 46522347).
248 Corbett, TB and Ballenger, JH. Corbett and Ballengers’s Eighteenth Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Denver for 1890. (Provo, UT: Brigham Young University Internet Archive. 2011). P733.
249 Corbett, TB and Ballenger, JH. Corbett and Ballengers’s Thirty-Second Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Denver for 1905. (Provo, UT: Brigham Young University Internet Archive. 2011). P734.
250 Advertised Letters. (Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat). March 20, 1905. P8.
251 Corbett, TB and Ballenger, JH. Corbett and Ballengers’s Eighteenth Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Denver for 1890. (Provo, UT: Brigham Young University Internet Archive. 2011). P733.
252 Ancestry.com. Colorado, Wills and Probate Records, 1875-1974 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.
253 For more information on Albert Lewin and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/lewin.html
254 Corbett, TB and Ballenger, JH. Corbett and Ballengers’s Eighteenth Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Denver for 1890. (Provo, UT: Brigham Young University Internet Archive. 2011). P733.
255 Probate Records, 1900-1946; Author: Denver County (Colorado). Clerk of the County Court; Probate Place: Denver, Colorado
256 Corbett, TB and Ballenger, JH. Corbett and Ballengers’s Thirty-Second Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Denver for 1905. (Provo, UT: Brigham Young University Internet Archive. 2011). P734.
257 For more information on Abson Goldsoll, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/goldsoll.html
258 United States Census, 1880. T. Levy in Household of A. Gooldsall, Leadville, Lake, Colorado, United States; citing enumeration district ED 73, sheet 313A, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), FHL microfilm 1,254,091.
259 For more information on Daniel Cohn, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/cohn.html
260 For more information on Barnabus Harris and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/harris.html
261 Corbett and Ballenger. Leadville, CO; USA. 1880. P111.
262 Matt Hulstine and Jeffrey P. Grant. Cohn. (Leadville, CO: Temple Israel Foundation). 2017.
263 "United States Passport Applications, 1795-1925," Simon Levy, 20 May 1884; citing Passport Application, United States, source certificate #, Passport Applications, 10/31/1795 - 12/31/1905., 265, NARA microfilm publications M1490 and M1372 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.). 2018.
264 Find a Grave. [Database and Images]. Memorial Page for Caroline Levy (1857–Apr 1926). [Find a Grave Memorial no. 143459339]. Citing Mount Zion Cemetery, Maspeth, Queens County, New York, USA ; Maintained by Lawrence Adams (contributor 47706875) .
265 Find a Grave, [Database and Images] Memorial Page for David Levy (1884–1 Jun 1936). [Find a Grave Memorial no. 143460376]. Citing Mount Zion Cemetery, Maspeth, Queens County, New York, USA ; Maintained by Lawrence Adams (contributor 47706875) .
266 Find a Grave. [Database and Images]. Memorial Page for Simon Levy (1848–Jan 1926). [Find a Grave Memorial no. 143459449]. Citing Mount Zion Cemetery, Maspeth, Queens County, New York, USA ; Maintained by Lawrence Adams (contributor 47706875) .
267 For more information on Henry Frankle and his family please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/frankle.html
268 For more information on Fred Butler and his family please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/butler.html
269 Personal. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). December 29, 1880. P4.
270 United States Census, 1880. Database with images. Citing NARA microfilm publication T9. (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration). 2020.
271 Corbett and Ballenger. Denver, CO; USA. 1880. P327.
272 Mining Sales and Transfers. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Weekly Herald). April 8, 1880. P2.
273 Mining Transfers of Summit County. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). May 28, 1880. P4.
274 For more information on Sol Kahn and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/kahn.html
275 Deeds Filed Yesterday. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). July 18, 1884. P4.
276 For more information on Jake Sands please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/sands-sandelowsky.html For more information on Jake Sands and his relationship to Elizabeth “Baby Doe” Tabor please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/sandstaboraffair.html
277 Matt Hulstine and Jeffrey P. Grant. Sands/Sandelowsky. Leadville, CO: Temple Israel Foundation. 2018.
278 A Social Dance. (Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat). November 13, 1891. P4.
279 To Attend The Congress. (Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat). November 18, 1891. P4.
280 The World Of Gaiety. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle). November 23,, 1891. P1.
281 For more information on Amelia Leppel and her family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/leppel.html
282 Pleasure And Gaiety. (Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat). December 10, 1892. P2.
283 Personal Paragraphs. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). April 16, 1882. P4.
284 Tenth Census of the United States, 1880. (NARA microfilm publication T9, 1,454 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C.
285 Corbett and Ballenger. Leadville, CO; USA. 1882. P185.
286 Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. Pennsylvania Death Certificates, 1906–1963. Series 11.90 (1,905 cartons). Harrisburg, Pennsylvania: Records of the Pennsylvania Department of Health, Record Group 11., 2020.
287 Ancestry.com. U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.
288 For more information on Ben Davies and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/davies.html
289 Corbett and Ballenger. Leadville, CO; USA. 1881. P325.
290 Caught Napping. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle). August 27, 1881. P7.
291 Corbett and Ballenger. Leadville, CO; USA. 1883. P185.
292 For more information on Joseph Londoner and his family, Please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/londoner.html
293 For more information on J.H. Horsnyder and his family, please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/horsnyder.html
294 TB Corbet and JH Ballenger. Corbet & Ballenger’s Eleventh Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Denver for 1883. (Denver, CO: Western History and Genealogy Dept., Denver Public Library. 2020.). P154, 178.
295 Fire Flashes. (Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle). December 1, 1883. P10.
296 United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls.
297 Family Search. Colorado State Census, 1885. Lake > 6 > Population > image 5 of 18; citing NARA microfilm publication M158 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration). 2016.
298 Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 [database on-line]. (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.) 2011. P999.
299 United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls.
300 New York, New York City Marriage Records, 1829-1940," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:24CM-6C1 : 10 February 2018), Victor Levy and Rebecca Kaplan, 28 Jan 1893; citing Marriage, Manhattan, New York, New York, United States, New York City Municipal Archives, New York; FHL microfilm 1,452,475.
301 United States Census, 1900. [database with images]. (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1972.); FHL microfilm 1,241,091.
302 JH Ballenger and Richards. Ballenger & Richard’s Twenty-Second Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Leadville for 1901. (Leadville, CO: Ballenger and Richards Publishers.1901). P216.
303 Society. (Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat). June 16, 1901. P6.
304 Among The Lodges. (Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat). March 16, 1902. P7.
305 List of Letters. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle). May 22, 1879. P2.
306 [Official] List Of Letters. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle). June 5, 1879. P2.
307 Tenth Census of the United States, 1880. (NARA microfilm publication T9, 1,454 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C.
308 Personal. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald). October 21, 1883. P4.
309 TB Corbett, WC Hoye and JH Ballenger. Corbet, Hoye and Co’s First Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City Of Leadville for 1880. (Leadville, CO: Democrat Printing Company. 1880). P229.
310 Hebrew Hop. (Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle). September 26, 1885. P4.
311 Unclaimed Telegrams. (Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle). March 26, 1879. P3.
312 Denver Public Library. Colorado Marriages 1858-1939. Denver, CO. USA. The Colorado Genealogical Society. 2004. P10,767.
313 Personal Mention. (Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat). September 23, 1905. P2.
314 Janice Fox. Heimberger. (Leadville, CO: Temple Israel Foundation). 2019. http://jewishleadville.org/heimberger.html
315 Pretty Wedding at the Temple. (Leadville, CO. USA. The Herald Democrat, September 19, 1905). P8
316 (Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat). September 23, 1905. P2.
317 Central School. (Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat). October 4, 1891. P2.
318 For more information on Ben Cohn and his family please visit: http://jewishleadville.org/cohn.html
319 A modern definition of “meletarian”, or a description of a “meletarian society”, cannot be found. This is likely a general academic club with the name derived from the Latin, melior, meaning to better or improve one’s self.
320 Meletarian Melange. (Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat). November 14, 1891. P4.

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Colorado State Census, 1885. Dave Levy in entry for S M Graves. 1885; citing NARA microfilm publication M158 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 498,507. 1885.

Congregation Israel. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. September 20, 1884.

Corbett, TB and Ballenger, JH. Corbet, and Ballenger’s Eighth Annual City Directory: Containing A Complete List Of The Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms Etc. In The City Of Denver For 1880. Denver, CO: Corbet and Ballenger Publishers. 1880.

Corbett, TB, Hoye, WC and Ballanger, JH. Corbet, Hoye and Co’s First Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City Of Leadville for 1880. Leadville, CO: Democrat Printing Company.1880.

Corbett, TB and Ballenger, JH. Corbet, and Ballenger’s Second Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City Of Leadville for 1881. Leadville, CO: Corbet and Ballenger Publishers.1881.

Corbett, TB and Ballenger, JH. Corbet, and Ballenger’s Third Annual City Directory: Containing A Complete List Of The Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms Etc. In The City Of Leadville For 1882. Leadville, CO: Corbet and Ballenger Publishers.1882.

Corbet, TB and Ballenger, JH. Corbet & Ballenger’s Eleventh Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Denver for 1883. Denver, CO: Western History and Genealogy Dept., Denver Public Library. 2020.

Corbett, TB and Ballenger, JH. Corbett, and Ballenger’s Fourth Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City Of Leadville for 1883. Leadville, CO: Corbet and Ballenger Publishers.1883.

Corbet, TB and Ballenger, JH. Corbet & Ballenger’s Twelfth Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Denver for 1884. Provo, UT: Brigham Young University Internet Archive. 2011.

Corbett, TB and Ballenger, JH. Corbet, and Ballenger’s Fifth Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City Of Leadville For 1884. Leadville, CO: Corbet and Ballenger Publishers. 1884.

Corbett, TB and Ballenger, JH. Corbet, and Ballenger’s Sixth Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City Of Leadville For 1885. Leadville, CO: Corbet and Ballenger Publishers. 1885.

Corbett, TB and Ballenger, JH. Corbet, and Ballenger’s Seventh Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City Of Leadville For 1886. Leadville, CO: Corbet and Ballenger Publishers. 1886.

Corbett, TB and Ballenger, JH. “Corbet and Ballenger’s Eighteenth Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Denver for 1890. Provo, UT: Brigham Young University Internet Archive. 2011.

Corbett, TB and Ballenger, JH. “Corbet and Ballenger’s Thrity-Second Annual City Directory: Containing a Complete List of the Inhabitants, Institutions, Incorporated Companies, Manufacturing Establishments, Business, Business Firms etc. in The City of Denver for 1905. Provo, UT: Brigham Young University Internet Archive. 2011.

County Court. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. June 15, 1882.

County Court. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. October 10, 1882.

Crooked Cooper. Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle. September 11, 1880.

Death Last Bidder. Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat. November 25, 1908.

De Arment, Robert K. Deadly Dozen: Forgotten Gunfighters of the Old West. Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 2010.

de Stolfe, Robert-George. Harrison and State Street. [Digitized Postcard]. Leadville, CO: Temple Israel Foundation Collection. 2015.

Denver Public Library. Colorado Marriages 1858-1939. Denver, CO. USA. The Colorado Genealogical Society. 2004

Deremo, Rhiannon. “Jim Leavy, Gunfighter.” True West Magazine, January 16, 2017.

District Court. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. February 1, 1882.

District Court. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. January 30, 1883.

District Court. Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat. August 23, 1892.

Easter. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. March 23, 1883.

Executrix Notice. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. January 3, 1883.

Family Search. Colorado State Census, 1885. Lake > 6 > Population > image 5 of 18; citing NARA microfilm publication M158 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration). 2016.

Filed For Record. Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat. November 11, 1899.

Final Notice. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. December 31, 1882.

Find a Grave. Memorial Page for Alfred P Levy (1848–14 Dec 1895). Find a Grave Memorial no. 6616727, Colma, San Mateo County, California, USA: Hills of Eternity Memorial Park; Maintained by Diane Reich (contributor 40197331). 2020.

Find a Grave. Memorial Page for Babette Halff Levy (10 May 1844–12 Feb 1926), Find a Grave Memorial no. 193602344. (East Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, USA: Home of Peace Memorial Park, East Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, USA). 2020.

Find a Grave. Memorial page for Bella Levy (1865–6 Jun 1946). Find a Grave Memorial no. 180315979. Price Hill, Hamilton County, Ohio, USA: Price Hill United Jewish Cemetery ; Maintained by Cindy S (contributor 18484625). 2020.

Find a Grave. [Database and Images]. Memorial Page for Caroline Levy (1857–Apr 1926). [Find a Grave Memorial no. 143459339]. Citing Mount Zion Cemetery, Maspeth, Queens County, New York, USA ; Maintained by Lawrence Adams (contributor 47706875) .

Find a Grave. [Database and Images]. Memorial Page for Cora Levy Rothschild (7 Jul 1876–26 Apr 1977), Find a Grave Memorial no. 65233481, citing Linn Grove Cemetery, Greeley, Weld County, Colorado, USA ; Maintained by ProgBase (contributor 47278889) .

Find a Grave, [Database and Images] Memorial Page for David Levy (1884–1 Jun 1936). [Find a Grave Memorial no. 143460376]. Citing Mount Zion Cemetery, Maspeth, Queens County, New York, USA ; Maintained by Lawrence Adams (contributor 47706875) .

Find a Grave. Memorial Page for David G Levy (1850–1923). Find a Grave Memorial no. 151290573. Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, USA: Adath Jeshurun Cemetery; Maintained by Crypt Tonight (contributor 48494116).

Find a Grave, [Database and Images]. Memorial Page for Irma Levy Cohen (20 Jan 1870–23 Sep 1937), Find a Grave Memorial no. 193602467; Maintained by Scott G (contributor 453) Cremated, who reports a Location of ashes unknown. Cremated at Rosedale Crematory.

Find a Grave. [Database and Images]. Memorial Page for Lewis Levy (4 Jun 1836–5 Nov 1914). Find a Grave Memorial no. 37861836, citing Adath Jeshurun Cemetery, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, USA ; Maintained by Miek Good (contributor 47114871) .

Find a Grave, [Database and Images]. Memorial Page for Lily Rose Levy Schnitzer (21 Mar 1878–30 May 1968), Find a Grave Memorial no. 172222629, citing Beth Israel Cemetery, Houston, Harris County, Texas, USA ; Maintained by Patrick Lee (contributor 48447064).

Find a Grave. [Database and Images]. Memorial Page for Otho Jacque Levy (14 Nov 1871–15 Apr 1959), Find a Grave Memorial no. 141156570, ; Maintained by Scott G (contributor 453) Cremated, Location of ashes is unknown, who reports a Cremated at Rosedale Crematory.

Find a Grave. Memorial Page for Lee Levy (1859–1918). Find a Grave Memorial no. 180316313, Price Hill, Hamilton County, Ohio, USA: Price Hill United Jewish Cemetery. Maintained by Cindy S (contributor 18484625) . 2020.

Find a Grave, [Database and Images]. Memorial Page for Morris A. Levy (24 Jun 1852–4 Sep 1914), [Find a Grave Memorial no. 9913323], Citing Congregation Emanuel Cemetery, Denver, Denver County, Colorado, USA ; Maintained by Digginrellies (contributor 46522347).

Find a Grave, [Database and Images] Memorial Page for Ralph Levy (1864–27 Jan 1890), [Find a Grave Memorial no. 156575929]. Citing Home of Peace Memorial Park, East Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, USA ; Maintained by Steve and Linda Malkson (contributor 48608432) .

Find a Grave, [Database and Images]. Memorial Page for Rene S Levy (3 Sep 1877–15 Mar 1946), [Find a Grave Memorial no. 173032894]. Citing Beth Israel Cemetery, Houston, Harris County, Texas, USA ; Maintained by Patrick Lee (contributor 48447064) .

Find a Grave. [Database and Images]. Memorial Page for Simon Levy (1848–Jan 1926). [Find a Grave Memorial no. 143459449]. Citing Mount Zion Cemetery, Maspeth, Queens County, New York, USA ; Maintained by Lawrence Adams (contributor 47706875) .

Find a Grave, [Database and Images]. Memorial Page for Solomon Levy (1836–26 Oct 1882), [Find a Grave Memorial no. 193602370]. Citing Home of Peace Memorial Park, East Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, USA ; Maintained by Scott G (contributor 453) .

Fire Flashes. Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle. December 1, 1883.

For Sale. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. January 14, 1883.

Forgot To A Leave Card. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle. January 31, 1893.

Fox, Janice. Heimberger. Leadville, CO: Temple Israel Foundation. 2019.

Gauthier, Jason. Availability of 1890 Census - History - U.S. Census Bureau. (Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Commerce). 1996.

Gentleman’s List. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle. July 31, 1879.

Good Advice. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. October 23, 1880.

Habeth Tshuva. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. October 4, 1884.

Hall, Archibald. M.D, L.R.S.E. The British American Journal of Medical And Physical Science Vol. V. Montreal, Quebec; CA. John C. Becket. 1850.

Hebrew Hop. Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle. September 26, 1885.

Hebrew Ladies Ball. Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle. January 20, 1883.

Hulstine, Matt and Grant, Jeffrey P.. Cohn. Leadville, CO: Temple Israel Foundation. 2017.

Hulstine, Matt, and Grant, Jeffrey P. Sands/Sandelowsky. Leadville, CO: Temple Israel Foundation. 2018.

In The Giddy Whirl. Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat. October 11, 1891.

Index to New York City Deaths 1862-1948. Indices prepared by the Italian Genealogical Group and the German Genealogy Group, and used with permission of the New York City Department of Records/Municipal Archives. 2020.

Jagged Justice. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. April 15, 1884.

Jim Levy. Jim Levy - Ancestry.com. Provo, Utah: Church Of Latter Day Saints. , 2020. https://www.ancestry.com/search/?name=Jim_Levy&event=1878_leadville-lake-colorado-usa_70426&birth=1842_dublin-dublin-ireland_91953&death=1882_tucson-pima-arizona-usa_67601&gender=m&residence=1877_cheyenne-laramie-wyoming-usa_67052&residence2=1876_deadwood-lawrence-south+dakota-usa_64001.

John Breathes The Air. Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat. November 21, 1893.

Lena Rupenthal’s Ruin. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle. May 9, 1889.

Levy Brothers Held For Misuse Of The Mails. Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat. December 30, 1916.

Lewis Lyon’s Reception. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. October 31, 1882.

License. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. January 1, 1881.

List Of Delinquent Taxes. Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat. October 12, 1903.

List Of Letters. Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle. October 20, 1883.

List of Letters. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle. May 22, 1879.

Manly, Nancy, and Worford, Sherrill. Lake County, US Census Index For 1860,1870 and 1880. Leadville, CO: Historical Research Cooperative. USA. 1985

Meletarian Melange. Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat. November 14, 1891.

Mines And Real Estate. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. February 27, 1881.

Mining Industry. Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle. April 28, 1893.

Mining Lease. Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat. February 28, 1896.

Mining Notes. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. May 10, 1882.

Mining Sales and Transfers. Leadville, CO: Leadville Weekly Herald. April 8, 1880.

Mining Transfers of Summit County. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. May 28, 1880.

Nerve Required To Face A Gun. Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat. July 7, 1907.

New York, New York City Marriage Records, 1829-1940," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:24CM-6C1 : 10 February 2018), Victor Levy and Rebecca Kaplan, 28 Jan 1893; citing Marriage, Manhattan, New York, New York, United States, New York City Municipal Archives, New York; FHL microfilm 1,452,475.

Notice. Leadville, CO: Leadville Democrat. May 7, 1881.

Notice. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. November 9, 1882.

Notice Of Forfeiture. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. October 19, 1882.

Now!!! Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. December 24, 1880.

[Official] List Of Letters. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle. June 5, 1879.

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Parks Bond Matter. Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat. August 4, 1891.

Paul Pry. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. July 15, 1882.

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Personal. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. December 29, 1880.

Personal. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. October 21, 1883.

Personal. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle. October 11, 1887.

Personal Mention. Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat. January 24, 1894.

Personal Mention. Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat. September 23, 1905.

Personal Paragraphs. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. April 16, 1882.

Personal Points. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. January 13, 1884.

Personal Points. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. October 4, 1884.

Pitkin’s Proud Paraders. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. April 2, 1882.

Pleasant Autumn Days. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle. September 11, 1893.

Pleasure And Gaiety. Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat. December 10, 1892.

Pointed Paragraphs. Leadville, CO. Leadville Daily Herald. June 6, 1882.

Preparing for Winter. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Herald. June 30, 1879.

Presentation. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. December 19, 1880.

Pretty Wedding at the Temple. Leadville, CO. USA. The Herald Democrat, September 19, 1905.

Probate Records, 1900-1946; Author: Denver County (Colorado). Clerk of the County Court; Probate Place: Denver, Colorado.

Professor Simon’s Party. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. October 4, 1880.

Rich Remembrances. Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle. October 6, 1883.

Public Charities. Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle. January 3, 1885.

Rochlin, Harriet, and Rochlin, Fred. Pioneer Jews: A New Life In The Far West. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin, 1984.

Roster of Men and Women Who Served in the World War from Colorado, 1917-18. Colorado, USA: Adjutant General, Colorado National Guard, 1941.

Scott, Glenn R.; Burnstein, F. Craig, Quesenberry, Carol, and Dumonceaux, Gayle M.. Historic Trail Map of the Leadville 1 X 2 Quadrangle, Central Colorado. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey. Central Publishing Group. 2004.

Search. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. December 18, 1882.

Seventh Street School. Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle. October 20, 1883.

Seventh Street School. Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle. December 8, 1883.

Sheriff’s Sale. Leadville, CO: Leadville, Daily Herald. March 24, 1885.

Sheriff’s Sale. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. March 31, 1885.

Simchas Taura Ball. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. October 23, 1881.

Simchas Torah. Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat. October 19, 1892.

Slight Accident on the South Park. Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat. July 13, 1886.

Social and Personal. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle. July 25, 1887.

Society. Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle. July 30, 1900.

Society. Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat. June 16, 1901.

Sood, Suemedha. Travel - Australia's Penal Colony Roots. London, England, U.K.: BBC, January 26, 2012.

St. Patrick’s Day Celebration. Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle. March 22, 1884.

Taffy Pull. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. June 15, 1884.

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The Atlantic and Pacific. Leadville, CO: Leadville Weekly Democrat. April 30, 1881.

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The Feast Of Chanuka. Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat. December 12, 1893.

The Gertrude. Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle. July 25, 1885.

The Hebrew Hop. Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle. September 26, 1885.

The Law’s Holiday. Leadville, CO: Carbonate Chronicle. October 11, 1884.

The Leadville Stock Exchange. Leadville Democrat. April 13, 1881.

The Lenten Season. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle. March 21, 1892.

The Mines. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. March 23, 1881.

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These Are Gay Times. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle. August 29, 1892.

To Attend The Congress. Leadville, CO: Herald Democrat. November 18, 1891.

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Personal. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. October 21, 1883. P4.

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United States Census, 1880. Mose J Levi in household of Nathan A Thorn, Leadville, Lake, Colorado, United States; Citing Enumeration District ED 78, sheet 390C, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), FHL microfilm 1,254,091.

United States Census, 1880. database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MFDJ-SC7 : 19 August 2017), Emma Levy in household of H Levy, Leadville, Lake, Colorado, United States; citing enumeration district ED 73, sheet 313A, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), FHL microfilm 1,254,091.

United States Census, 1880. [database with images], Family Search (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MFDJ-Q6D : 19 August 2017), T Levy in household of A Gooldsall, Leadville, Lake, Colorado, United States; citing enumeration district ED 73, sheet 313A, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), FHL microfilm 1,254,091.

United States Census, 1900. [database with images]. Family Search (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MSV7-WBR : accessed 23 October 2020), Victor Levy, Borough of Manhattan, Election District 9 New York City Ward 10, New York County, New York, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 231, sheet 21A, family 469, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1972.); FHL microfilm 1,241,091.

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United States Passport Applications, 1795-1925. Database With Images, FamilySearch. (M1372) Passport Applications, 1795-1905 > Roll 250, vol 552-553, 1882 Jun > image 367 of 1515; citing NARA microfilm publications M1490 and M1372 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration). 2018.

United States Passport Applications, 1795-1925. Simon Levy, 20 May 1884; citing Passport Application, United States, source certificate #, Passport Applications, 10/31/1795 - 12/31/1905., 265, NARA microfilm publications M1490 and M1372 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.). 2018.

Visiting The Valley. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle. August 8, 1892.

Watches. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Herald. April 17, 1881.

Work On Those Old Cases. Leadville, CO: Leadville Daily Evening Chronicle. March 5, 1896.

To cite any of the information in this biography, please use the following reference.

AUTHOR: Jeffrey P. Grant
EDITOR: William Korn
SOURCE: Jewish Surnames/Levy
PUBLISHED BY: Temple Israel Foundation. Leadville, CO; USA. 2020.
STABLE URL: http://www.jewishledville.org/levy.html

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