Sands-Sandelowsky

The Sands name appeared regularly in the newspapers of primal Leadville. Below is a chronicle of citations concerning the Sands brothers during their time in the Wild West.

November, 1879:

 

The rapid advancement of Leadville in the character of its buildings and elegant stores to the standard of a first-class city has astonished all mankind and is a subject of common remark; so that if we were to tell that S. Pelton & Company had opened a Clothing House under the Tabor Opera House that is a rival in beauty and elegance of the finest stores of the kind in Chicago and New York, you would not be at all surprised; but such is a fact. This old and wealthy firm, who have large establishments in Central and Blackhawk, have concluded to make Leadville headquarters, and are now opening one of the finest and most selective stocks of clothing and gentlemen’s furnishing goods to be found in the West. Their object is to make it a strictly first-class house and they will not only carry the very best of custom-made clothing, gentlemen’s furnishing goods, & c., but after the fifteenth of November will add a first-class merchant tailoring establishment, and will carry a large line of fashionable clothes. This is the first solid glass front opened in Leadville, each pane being 6’ 11” feet and in elegance will be one of the attractive features in the city.

Another article added some points about the company’s advertising as the One Price Clothing Store and about its manager:

 

The owners despise the Chatham street way of doing business-of asking three prices and taking two, or selling at cost with a view of building up a trade, and you will find at their stores but one price, and that marked in plain figures so that the customer, if he is any judge of goods, knows what he is doing when he buys...

 

Old houses like S. Pelton & Co. make fair, square dealing the basis of their immense trade... Their long lines of counters and shelves are filled with a select assortment of suits, overcoats and gents’ furnishing goods, the stock amounting to upwards of $25,000... Mr. Sandelowsky has charge of the establishment here and his courteous and fair dealing is making him a host of friends.

Not too many months later, Jacob Sandelowsky shortened his last name to Sands and the firm adopted the name of Sands, Pelton & Co.

 

The brothers Jacob (born 1852) and Charles (born December, 1856) Sands, Anglicized from Sandelowsky, came early to Leadville and were well settled by 1880 at 308 Harrison Avenue where they were clothiers and kept their residence. Apparently immigrants from the German-Polish border region, Charles had arrived in America in 1875.

Names associated with this surname:

  • Jacob (Sandelowsky) Sands
  • Charles (Sandelowsky) Sands
  • Sadie Sands
  • child Sands

July, 1880, on the occasion of a visit to Leadville by General U. S. Grant:

 

The Tabor Opera House, from roof to cellar, presented a most attractive appearance. The flag staff, from which flows a large and beautiful flag, is hung with large streamers being caught in heavy bows on the ground floor. The balcony is simply a bower of flags and bunting. A large colored star hangs amid a bevy of flags from one of the double windows. This decoration was under the supervision of Sands, Pelton & Co., clothiers in the same building. [The day before Grants’ arrival, Joseph P. Mundy had caused all passersby near the corner of Harrison Avenue and Third Street to stop and hold their breaths as he shinnied up the 105-foot pole on the opera house and adjusted the large flag at the top of the pole which was only four inches in diameter.]

August, 1880:

 

Among the most frequent patrons of the Mount Massive Hotel during that summer were the members of the Tabor Light Cavalry. Usually the mounted soldiers went in a body, all wearing uniforms which were part of the extensive equipment donated to the company by Lieutenant Governor H. A. W. Tabor. These uniforms were purchased from Sands, Pelton & Company, located on the street floor of the Tabor Opera House building, and had been made by that company’s New York tailors. Tabor had paid $5,000 for complete outfits for thirty-seven privates, eight corporals, five sergeants, three line officers, and five staff officers. Although he held the honorary commission of general, he did not take part in the organization since he seldom was able to spend much time in Leadville, his many interests, including the building of the Tabor Block in Denver, requiring his presence in the Capital City.

 

Postmaster Smith’s public statement house to house delivery of mail was to be inaugurated the following week, that twenty street letter boxes would be installed throughout the city so patrons would not have to walk long distances to mail letters, and that the carriers’ uniforms, made of regulation gray cloth with black braid and buttons initialed “P.O.” plus gray caps with visors and gold wreaths encircling the number assigned each carrier, had arrived at Sands, Pelton and Company’s store for final fitting.

December, 1880:

 

On Christmas Day the number of private parties again was legion; J. M. Stevenson, president of the Y. M. C. A., received a $100 check from W. S. Ward for the free reading room; sixteen friends of Jacob Sands honored him at a banquet in the Clarendon Hotel; the city council dined en masse, also at the Clarendon; the Tabor Hose Company enjoyed a supper and general jollification at the Central Fire Station; an unnamed donor gave each of the inmates in the county jail a quarter pound of tobacco; the Catholic Fair opened in City Hall; and the Turnvereins observed Christmas Day.

January, 1881:

 

During the first week of 1881, C. C. Ruthrauff was in Leadville preparing an estimate for the owners of the Billing and Eilers’ Smelter as to the cost of installing electric lighting throughout the plant to replace the dangerous oil and gas lights then in use. Before Ruthrauff left, he received the contract for the installation, furthermore he had convinced a number of the city’s businessmen the electric light had passed the experimental stage and was becoming the best way for the lighting of business houses and city streets. As a result the Leadville Electric Light Company was organized on March 25 for the for the purpose of “manufacturing and supplying the city of Leadville and the cities and towns of Lake, Summit and Gunnison counties, and the streets thereof with electric light.” A capitalization of $100,000 was agreed upon with 2,000 shares of fifty dollars each. The incorporators were C. C. Davis, R. G. Dill, J. L. Bartow, Charles Boettcher, H. C. Chapin, James Streeter, Simon Goldstein, Jacob Schloss, C. E. Wyman, M. H. Monheimer, M. J. Waldheimer, Jacob Sands and David May.

October, 1881:

 

McCarthy was also active in the promotion of the use of electric lights. At approximately the same time he became the owner of the hardware business, he, Pap Wyman and a few other Harrison Avenue businessmen began discussing the advantages of electric lighting in comparison to gas lamps and jets and the effect the prompt introduction of electricity in business houses might have on the Christmas trade. Wyman made a canvass of the businessmen in his part of town and asked each if he would be interested in using electric lights in his store. Others of the promoters made similar inquiries in their immediate business blocks and the response was so enthusiastic a special meeting was held in C. S. Thomas’ law office for making tentative plans. The enthusiasm for the idea was beyond all expectation, and the group proceeded to organize the Merchants’ Electric Light Company with J. W. Smith of Daniels & Fisher’s as president, C. E. Wyman, vice president, Councilman I. W. Chatfield, treasurer, and Attorney M. J. Waldheimer, secretary and counselor. Among the business firms whose proprietors signed up as subscribers were the Windsor Hotel, McCarthy Hardware, Frankle & Butler, May & Shoenberg, Charles Boettcher & Company, Sands Pelton & Company, Janowitz & Marx and R. G. Dill of the Herald.

July, 1882:

 

In preparing for a bigger and better baseball season, the Leadville Baseball and Athletic Association was organized with these officers and directors:

 

. . . L. M. Goddard, president; George K. Fisher, J. W. Fisher, and C. F. Fishback, vice presidents; John L. Wright, secretary; Joe H. Playter, treasurer; Harry P. Keily, manager. Directors: Sam’l Newhouse, W. R. Phelps, Jacob Sands, George W. Cook, Sam Jacobs, Fred Schafer and C. E. Wyman.

 

While the roster of the town team, the Blues, was not complete, Manager Keily stated he had lined up a nucleus of good players around which he could build a strong club, but if necessary he would bring in players from the outside.

December, 1880:

 

On Christmas Day the number of private parties again was legion; J. M. Stevenson, president of the Y. M. C. A., received a $100 check from W. S. Ward for the free reading room; sixteen friends of Jacob Sands honored him at a banquet in the Clarendon Hotel; the city council dined en masse, also at the Clarendon; the Tabor Hose Company enjoyed a supper and general jollification at the Central Fire Station; an unnamed donor gave each of the inmates in the county jail a quarter pound of tobacco; the Catholic Fair opened in City Hall; and the Turnvereins observed Christmas Day.

January, 1881:

 

During the first week of 1881, C. C. Ruthrauff was in Leadville preparing an estimate for the owners of the Billing and Eilers’ Smelter as to the cost of installing electric lighting throughout the plant to replace the dangerous oil and gas lights then in use. Before Ruthrauff left, he received the contract for the installation, furthermore he had convinced a number of the city’s businessmen the electric light had passed the experimental stage and was becoming the best way for the lighting of business houses and city streets. As a result the Leadville Electric Light Company was organized on March 25 for the for the purpose of “manufacturing and supplying the city of Leadville and the cities and towns of Lake, Summit and Gunnison counties, and the streets thereof with electric light.” A capitalization of $100,000 was agreed upon with 2,000 shares of fifty dollars each. The incorporators were C. C. Davis, R. G. Dill, J. L. Bartow, Charles Boettcher, H. C. Chapin, James Streeter, Simon Goldstein, Jacob Schloss, C. E. Wyman, M. H. Monheimer, M. J. Waldheimer, Jacob Sands and David May.

Christmas, 1882:

 

There was also this strictly male affair:

 

SACRED SPORT

 

The following card of invitation in a measure explains the prelude to an entertainment, the history of which will probably never be wholly written. The reader will, to a degree, have to measure the affair by triangulation:

 “‘As we journey through life let us live by the way. ‘After 2 o’clock P.M., pull the latch string at rooms Nos. 12, 14 and 16, Daniels, Fisher & Co.’s block. Christmas, 1882. C. C. Hendrie, George R. Skinner, M. H. McNary, W. R. Day, Jake Sands, Sam Adams, Clinton Bennett.”

The seven gentlemen who fathered the above need no introduction to the readers of THE CHRONICLE. They are all young gentlemen to the manner born, all occupying important positions in the business community, and not unknown to the best society circles. They are all away from home, and live a delightful bachelor’s life in the building referred to in the invitation. Their suite of rooms is elegantly furnished, and yesterday presented a holiday appearance decidedly pleasant to see. Once determined to entertain their friends, nothing was considered too good for their guests, and carte blanch was given their chosen caterer, Monsieur La Pierce, chef de cuisine of the Clarendon, who fully satisfied the most extravagant tastes of the epicurean hosts and their guests, as the following bill of fare indicates:

Fried Oysters on Toast.

Chablis.

Chicken Salad a la Chas. Henry.

Chicken Salad a la Stanley.

Champagne “Trappe.”

Stuffed Turkey with Chestnuts.

Punch a la Royal.

Roast Suckling Pig.

Roast California Quail.

Assorted Sardines on Toast.

Mumm’s Extra Dry. Prime Cognac.

Imported Cigars and Cigarettes.

Bon Bons.

It is probable no latch string was ever pulled so often, or more vigorously, than the one referred to, and the procession that advanced upon the groaning tables seemed almost endless. It is said not less than two hundred gentlemen were recipients of the bounty of the agreeable hosts...

...Speeches were made by Messrs. Stebbins, Fleming, McNary, Sands, Ten Eyck and others, and songs were sung by Messrs. Skinner, Van Evera, Londoner, Miller, Porter, and everybody else present.

During 1883, Jake was amongst those celebrating the Palace of Fashion verdict.

April, 1883

 

There have been a good many thieves in Leadville, but for one who did not know when he had enough, George W. Houston, may, without doing injustice to others should be awarded the diploma. For some time Detective J. H. Casserleigh has suspected Houston of being a thief, and last fall he searched the premises of where he lived, but found nothing. Houston is employed by a number of persons around town to take charge of their apartments. Among them are Mayor John D. Fleming, Judge J. Y. Marshall, John Marshall and Charles Sands. These gentlemen have missed articles from time to time. A few weeks ago Judge J. Y. Marshall had a gold watch and chain stolen from him. He informed detective Casserleigh of the matter. This morning [April 28] a CHRONICLE reporter noticed that the detective was in an unusual hurry walking down Harrison avenue.

The reporter followed him to No. 107 Harrison avenue, entered and found his man searching the room. The detective was at first very reticent but finally said that he was looking for stolen property. He selected from other things a Colt’s revolver, a silk duster, a silver watch and pen-knife marked “John Fleming.” Mayor Fleming at once recognized the knife as his property. Judge J. Y. Marshall said the silk duster was his. Houston, who was shortly afterward arrested, said that the watch and chain were the property of Charles Sands, who had lent them to him. Mr. Sands denied this, stating that he had missed the watch and chain yesterday morning. Houston confessed to having stolen the other property.

This afternoon a CHRONICLE reporter, in company with Mr. Casserleigh, proceeded to search the room and trunk further. Among the many things were found a pair of sealskin mitts, the property of Mr. John Marshall, a pair of pants and a pair of gloves, the property of Judge J. Y. Marshall; a lot of stockings marked “C.” and a shirt, which are supposed to belong to Mr. Charles M. Cavender; a blue shirt which belongs to Mr. John D. Fleming. The two large trunks Houston had been filling with silk and linen handkerchiefs, stockings and valuable underwear. A picture of a white woman was in one of the trunks, and on the back of it was written in a clear hand: “Accept this as a slight testimonial of the affections of Ella.” Thrown in one corner of the room was a lot of clothes. Taken as a whole Houston had a collection of all kinds of wearing apparel, which would last him during life. It is thought that he has sent some of the stolen articles away... Houston was captured and taken before Judge O’Brien, who sent him to the criminal court for trial [where Judge Goldthwaite found him guilty as changed and sentenced him to serve time in the county jail].

For Memorial Day, 1883, Jacob joined his fellow staff officers of the Third Infantry of the Colorado National Guard in a parade to the Evergreen Cemetery and he attended the customary oratory.

July 2, 1883:

 

WELL-KNOWN SPORTING HOUSE

TOTALLY GUTTED BY FIRE

 

This morning about 5 o’clock, a fire broke out at the Clipper saloon, on Harrison avenue, and in an instant almost the whole interior of the building was in flames. It seems that the fire originated in the explosion of a kerosene lamp that was used for cooking by the keeper at the lunch counter. The walls and ceiling of the room were covered with a heavy paper that ignited like tinder, and in a moment the flames had encompassed every portion of the room and were leaping out in front to the distance of twenty feet. Officer John Cudihee, who was on duty on Harrison avenue at the time, ran to the nearest fire alarm box and turned in the alarm. The department hurried to the fire, and in just two and a half minutes from the time of the first alarm was sounded, they were on hand and had two streams of water playing on the building. But the paper and dry wood furniture ignited so easily and burned so rapidly that it was impossible to extinguish the flames before the whole interior of the building had been gutted. The redwood front of the house also burned to a charred cinder.

Everything in the building was totally destroyed with the exception of the billiard tables, and they were so badly damaged that it is a question whether they can be repaired or not. The damage done by the fire was not wholly confined to the Clipper saloon. Daniels, Fisher & Smith also suffered a loss of about $3,000. The loss of the Clipper building is about $2,000, and the loss in furniture, bar fixtures, etc. probably $2,000 more. The building is owned by Jake and Charley Sands, and the saloon was owned by Thomas Latta, formerly of Kokomo. There was about $2,000 insurance on the building and an equal amount on the mixtures, which will hardly cover the loss. The fire department deserve especial praise for the time they made in getting to the fire and the work they did after they got there. The building will be repaired at once by the owners, and it will be but a short time until the Clipper will be in as good shape as ever.

 

 Joe Smith [an employee of Latta] lost about $500 in the fire. There were two valuable oil paintings, painted by his wife, lost among other things.

 

“Shorty,” who ran the lunch counter, had $40 in his coat, which was hanging up. He failed to save it.

By October, 1883:

 

The new Clipper Building, erected by Sands & Pelton, at 315 Harrison Avenue, is nearly completed, and is a fine building. It is a two-story brick structure, 25 feet wide by 100 feet long, and cost about $8,000. It was built under the supervision of George E. King, Thomas Roberts doing the carpenter work. It will be occupied by John G. Morgan, the lower floor to be a saloon and billiard room and the upper floor will be occupied as a club room.

December, 1883:

 

Adding to the festivities of the week between Christmas and New Year’s was the Jewish ball in commemoration of the Feast of the Dedication:

 

Conspicuous among the innumerable events that have passed into history, since the last anniversary of our Lord, is one which occurred last night [December 27] in the City Hall on Sixth Street, and which was unquestionably among the consummate successes of the season. It was the offspring of a festival that occurs annually in commemoration of that joyous hour of the deliverance of the Jews from Persian captivity and persecution. Since that time the event has been observed right loyally in almost every city, and the Chanukah has been most prominent in the bulletin of observances. Several weeks past it was determined to celebrate the holiday in the Clouds, and in anticipation of the event elaborate preparations were made by the Hebrew Benevolent Association.

City Hall was selected, and the doors were thrown ajar last night upon a scene such as is rarely witnessed or surpassed in any city of the most pretentious endowments. A large gathering was expected and the arrangements were accordingly extensive, and it may be said that the affair eclipsed any former demonstration of the kind in the records of Leadville sociology. At an early hour the First Brigade Band, under the direction of Professor Henry Simon, took their places upon the stage, and when their instruments were in accord, the hall was crowded with the most select and representative citizens of the place, together with wives and daughters, all attired most elegantly. The various committees were on hand promptly and were constituted as follows:

On Arrangement-Messrs. Sam Mayer, M. D. Altman and Sol Herman.

On Reception-Messrs. J. H. Monheimer (chairman), J. Kahn, J. Schloss, S. Mooney, S. Selix, and M. Kahn.

On Floor-Messrs. M. H. Monheimer (chairman), Sol Rice, Cahn, H. J. Eliel, Charles Sands, and I. Bernheimer.

The March 11, 1884, Purim Bal Masque was attended by Jake dressed as a Millionaire Miner and Charles as Prince Bonaparte crossing the Mosquito Range.

 

 

 

June, 1884:

 

At the closing session of the coroner’s inquest held before Charles Fielding on June 23, the jurors-W. F. Dillon, C. E. Wyman, Jacob Sands, W. B. Ragland, B. F. Stickley and Ed Steele-handed down this verdict:

 

That D. C. McCune and Joseph H. Mallory came to their deaths by falling off the west wall of the Zoo theatre building on State street between Harrison avenue and Pine street, on the morning of the 18th of June, 1884, during the fire at said building, and the jurors believe that said fire was of incendiary origin.

 

 

 

In the 1885 census, Charles was recorded as a merchant living at 301 Harrison Avenue.

 

 

January, 1885:

 

May’s strongest competitor in the men’s clothing line was Charles Sands, who advertised for all to “come at once and secure bargains at 312 Harrison.”

 

 

February, 1885:

 

 Charles Sands, the popular successor to Sands, Pelton & Co., was fitting an overcoat upon a customer when the man of the pencil interrupted and abruptly asked, “How’s business?” The smile that radiated his face was a sufficient answer, and dismissing the customer with a brand new outfit, he turned and answered:

 

 “Business! the prospects were never more encouraging. Everybody seems to have been striking it rich during the past two weeks, and I never saw a year start off with better assurances of a lively season. Of course our business is not subject to spasmodic fits and starts, like many others, but it has a standard, and when it is above or below we have pretty reliable evidence of the condition of the money market. I believe that we are going to see the old days of ‘80 this year, and convinced of it, I have increased my stock very materially. The mines are all under development and large forces of men are being employed. The smelters are all running steadily and there is everything to indicate that the present season will be one of the best the merchants have ever enjoyed.”

 

 “What the travelling men say is the best evidence” interpolated Col. Jake Sands, who arrived from Denver yesterday morning, “and they, one and all, admit Leadville to be the best town in the state. They say they feel secure in all their orders, and pay the greatest compliment to the merchants for their promptness in canceling their obligations. I, myself, am in Denver at present, and I am free to confess that Leadville today does on a comparison, a larger business.”

 

 “We are perfectly satisfied with the outlook,” put in the proprietor, “and I’m willing to wager a new hat that Leadville will outdo Denver the present season.”

February, 1885: Jacob was noted as the quartermaster of the Leadville battalion of the Colorado National Guard.

 

 

 

April, 1886: Charles is appointed paymaster of the Knights of Sherwood Forest.

 

 

 

July, 1886: Sands, Pelton & Co. is a financial backer of the proposed new sewer system.

March 29, 1887: The eighth annual Purim Bal Masque was held at the Tabor Opera House and Charles attended as a member of the committee of arrangements.

 

 

 

Charles married Sadie (born in Colorado of New York natives during November, 1864) in 1895. The 1900 census found the couple living with a child at 124 West 7th Street, a rental, and Charles was still in the clothing business.

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