Bergman

Jacob Bergman:

Born: 1864

Married to Pearl Blumberg in 1886

Divorced in 1903

Immigrated in 1887

Born in Russia

Documented Addresses in Leadville

1891: 115 W. 2nd St.

1892: 122 Harrison Ave.

1894: 122 Harrison Ave.

1895: 103 Harrison Ave.

1897: 122 Harrison Ave.

1898: 203 Harrison Ave.

1899: 402 W. 3D.

1900: 122 Harrison Ave.

1901: 122 Harrison Ave.

1902 - 1909: 223 Harrison Ave.

 

Pearl (Blumberg) (Bergman) Coleman:

Born: 1866

Married to Jacob Bergman in 1886

Divorced in 1903

Married to Milton Coleman in 1905

Immigrated in 1887

Born in Russia

Documented Addresses in Leadville

1894: 122 Harrison Ave.

1897: 122 Harrison Ave.

1898: 122 Harrison Ave.

1899: 122 Harrison Ave.

1900: 122 Harrison Ave.

1901: 122 Harrison Ave.

1903: 116 W. Chestnut St.

1904: 116 W. Chestnut St.

1910:  226 W. 5th St.

Samuel Bergman:

Born: 1889

Died: ?

Born in Colorado

Documented Addresses in Leadville

1900: 122 Harrison Ave.

1908 - 1915: 226 W. 5th St.

 

Manuel Bergman:

Born: 1896

Died: ?

Born in Colorado

Documented Addresses in Leadville

1900: 122 Harrison Ave.

1910 – 1917: 226 W. 5th St.

 

 

Esther Bergman:

Born: 1897

Died: ?

Born in Colorado

Documented Addresses in Leadville

1900: 122 Harrison Ave.

1910, 1914 – 1917: 226 W. 5th St.

Harry Bergman:

Born: 1898

Died: ?

Born in Colorado

Documented Addresses in Leadville

1900: 122 Harrison Ave.

1910, 1914 – 1917: 226 W. 5th St.

 

 

Pauline Bergman

Born: 1893

Died: 1893

 

Other Names Associated with the Bergmans:

Samuel Blumberg

Paulina Blumberg

Milton Coleman

Mildred Coleman

Names associated with this surname:

  • Jacob Bergman
  • Pearl (Blumberg) (Bergman) Coleman
  • Samuel Bergman
  • Manuel Bergman
  • Esther Bergman
  • Harry Bergman
  • Pauline Bergman
  • Samuel Blumberg
  • Paulina Blumberg
  • Milton Coleman
  • Mildred Coleman

Jacob and Pearl Bergman were married in Russian Poland in 1886 and immigrated to the United States in 1887.   Pearl was the daughter of Samuel and Paulina Blumberg, who were also Leadville residents.   By 1889 the Bergmans had made it to Colorado where they gave birth to a son, Samuel, who shared the same name as Pearl’s father.  1891 is the first year the Bergmans appear in the Leadville City Directories.   At this time Jacob Bergman is listed as running a clothing store on 115 W 2nd St.  Bergman continued to work in the clothing industry until he became a Travel Insurance Agent in 1897.

 

During that time the Bergmans experienced tragedy and joy.  In 1893 they gave birth to a daughter, Pauline, who shared the same name as Pearl’s mother.  Pauline only lived one month before she passed away.   This illustrates the high infant mortality rates in Leadville in the late 19th century.  In a change of luck, the Bergmans gave birth to another child, Manuel, in 1896.   Following this, Esther was born in 1897, and Harry in 1898.   There was also a close call with fire at Jacob Bergman’s residence due to a blocked chimney in 1897.  Luckily the blaze was extinguished before the situation became critical.

 

In 1898 Bergman began working at a men’s furnishing goods store on 223 Harrison Ave.  This did not last long and he began working as a clerk for M. B. Miller from 1899 to 1902.   In 1902 a trouser thief was on the loose in Leadville and Bergman helped identify the stolen pants and property during the subsequent investigation.   Pearl Bergman also worked in Leadville.  In 1894 she worked for a men’s furnishing goods store.  The 1897 through 1900 directories show Pearl Bergman active in the clothing industry, sometimes aiding her husband.   In 1897 she worked with her father, Samuel Blumberg, in a clothing store.  The directories list her at 122 Harrison Ave during this period.

There was dissension within the Bergman marriage because Jacob and Pearl divorced in 1903.  The cause of divorce was stated to be “desertion” on the part of Jacob.   After the divorce, Pearl lived at 116 W. Chestnut St.   In addition to the divorce, Pearl also experienced other difficulties.  She is listed in the Herald Democrat under “Delinquent Taxes” in 1897, 1898, 1901, 1903, 1906 and 1907.   It is not clear if these financial difficulties stemmed from the divorce or were something separate.  Pearl would go on to marry Milton Coleman in 1905.   Coleman was a local mechanic who ran a car repair shop in town until at least 1918.   The city directories show the Bergman children followed their mother and lived with Coleman.  Pearl also had a daughter, Mildred, with Coleman in 1906.

 

After 1902 Bergman ran his own clothing shop at 223 Harrison Ave. and was active until at least 1909.   Bergman helped conduct sales at various shops in Leadville. The Herald Democrat contains advertisements publicizing a bankruptcy sale which Bergman presided over.   Jacob Bergman’s son, Samuel, worked as a clerk, first for H. Isaacs and then E. Pelton from 1909 to 1915.   Manuel Bergman started working in 1911, first as a caller and then at the Arkansas Valley Smelter from 1915-1917.   Harry Bergman began working for M.G. Alexander as an assistant in 1912.  In 1917 Harry Bergman worked at the Arkansas Valley Smelter.  Milton Coleman, Samuel, Manuel, Harry and Esther Bergman are all listed at the same address, 226 W. 5th St., despite their various occupations from 1907 through 1918.

Jacob Bergman disappears from city directories after 1909, however he still lived in Leadville until his death in 1917.   The Herald Democrat covered his funeral,

 

“Numerous old friends, fellow Masons and Woodmen turned out yesterday afternoon to attend funeral services held for the late Jacob Bergman, a resident of Leadville for years, who died Monday last.  The services were held at the Masonic hall at 2:30.  The public ceremonies here were simple- Ross Pearson, the worshipful master of the Ionic Lodge No. 35, gave an obituary of the late member, and the congregation then proceeded to the Jewish cemetery where Mr. Bergman was laid to rest.

 

Mr. Pearson conducted the Masonic ritual at the graveside and N. H. Miller read the burial ritual of the Jewish church.

 

At the Masonic hall, which was filled by those attending, the casket was profusely covered with floral tributes which came from the two fraternal orders and individual friends.

 

The pall bearers were Fred Stuthman, Sr., Alan Melville, Harry Mamlock, Dr. Sam Raabe, I. Grossmayer and C. B. Carter.”

 After the funeral, Bergman’s children took out an ad in the paper to specifically thank the citizens of Leadville for their condolences over the passing of their late father.   Bergman was a member of the local Woodmen and Mason societies and both of these groups turned out to mourn at his funeral.

 

Some of the Bergman children remained in Leadville for a short time after the death of their father.  Samuel Bergman is the exception, his last appearance in Leadville is the 1915 city directory.   Manuel Bergman was appointed the guardian of his younger brother Harry in 1917 after Jacob Bergman passed away.   In addition to this, Manuel was listed on the “Lake County’s Role of Honor” in June 1917 after he registered for the draft.   However, Manuel Bergman did not remain in Leadville. In 1919, he is mentioned in the Herald Democrat, as visiting Leadville from Salida after a recent surgical operation.   Harry Bergman went on to attend the University of Colorado in 1917.   Esther Bergman is last listed in the 1917 city directory.   It is unclear how long Milton and Pearl Coleman stayed in Leadville after 1918.

1 U.S. Census Bureau. 1900 Census.

2 U.S. Census Bureau. 1900 Census.

3 1891 Leadville City Directory

4 1897 Leadville City Directory

5 Leadville Hebrew Cemetery

6 U.S. Census Bureau. 1900 Census.

7 U.S. Census Bureau. 1900 Census.

8 “A Small Blaze.” Herald Democrat, January 3, 1897. Accessed June 29, 2016. https://www.coloradohistoricnewspapers.org

9 1898-1902 Leadville City directories

10 “Trouser Thieves.” Herald Democrat, December 27, 1902. Accessed June 29, 2016. https://www.coloradohistoricnewspapers.org

11 1894-1900 Leadville City Directories

12 “Mrs. Bergman Gets Decree.” Herald Democrat, December 18, 1903. Accessed June 29, 2016. https://www.coloradohistoricnewspapers.org

13 1903 Leadville City Directory

14 “Delinquent Taxes.” Herald Democrat, Fall 1897, 1899,1902, 1904, 1907, 1908. Accessed July 30, 2016. https://www.coloradohistoricnewspapers.org

15 U.S. Census Bureau. 1910 Census.

16 1905-1918 Leadville City Directories

17 U.S. Census Bureau. 1910 Census.

18 1902-1909 Leadville City Directories

19 “Advertisement.” Herald Democrat, May 17, 1905. Accessed June 29, 2016. https://www.coloradohistoricnewspapers.org

20 1909-1915 Leadville City Directories

21 1911-1917 Leadville City Directories

22 1909-1918 Leadville City Directories

23 “Jacob Bergman.” Herald Democrat, April 12, 1917. Accessed June 29, 2016. https://www.coloradohistoricnewspapers.org

24 “Jacob Bergman.” Herald Democrat, April 12, 1917. Accessed June 29, 2016. https://www.coloradohistoricnewspapers.org

25 “Card of Thanks.” Herald Democrat, April 15, 1917. Accessed June 29, 2016. https://www.coloradohistoricnewspapers.org

26 1915 Leadville City Directory

27 “Appointed Guardian.” Herald Democrat, April 19, 1917. Accessed June 29, 2016. https://www.coloradohistoricnewspapers.org

28 “Lake County’s Roll of Honor.” Herald Democrat, June 11, 1917. Accessed June 29, 2016. https://www.coloradohistoricnewspapers.org

29 “Personal Mention.” Herald Democrat, April 28, 1919. Accessed June 29, 2016. 2016. https://www.coloradohistoricnewspapers.org

30 “Personal Mention.” Herald Democrat, December 27, 1917. Accessed June 29, 2016. 2016. https://www.coloradohistoricnewspapers.org

31 1917 Leadville City Directory

Temple Israel Foundation

208 West 8th Street

Leadville, Colorado 80461

303.709.7050

Temple Israel Museum

201 West 4th Street

Leadville, Colorado 80461

longled@longled.cnc.net

Hebrew Cemetery

Within Evergreen Cemetery

North end of James Street, Leadville

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